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Trends in educational assortative marriage in China from 1970 to 2000

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  • Hongyun Han

    (University of Wisconsin–Madison)

Abstract

This research examines trends in educational assortative marriage in China among first marriages from 1970 to 2000 using data from the 2000 China Population Census and the 2001 Chinese Demographic Reproductive Health Survey. The results reveal decreasing educational homogamy rates from 1970 to 1980. However, the estimated odds of educational homogamy increase substantially between 1980 and 1995 and then grow at a slower pace in the late 1990s. Further, in urban areas, increasing rates of resemblance between spouses occur a decade earlier and at a higher level, compared to rural areas. Overall, the results indicate that senior high school graduates and college graduates in the late 1990s are less likely to marry those with less education than those in the 1970s in modern China.

Suggested Citation

  • Hongyun Han, 2010. "Trends in educational assortative marriage in China from 1970 to 2000," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 22(24), pages 733-770, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:22:y:2010:i:24
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:dem:demres:v:38:y:2018:i:34 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:chieco:v:47:y:2018:i:c:p:27-46 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Du, Julan & Wang, Yongqin & Zhang, Yan, 2015. "Sex imbalance, marital matching and intra-household bargaining: Evidence from China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 197-218.
    4. Yue Qian & Zhenchao Qian, 2014. "The gender divide in urban China: Singlehood and assortative mating by age and education," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(45), pages 1337-1364, December.
    5. Martin Piotrowski & Yuying Tong & Yueyun Zhang & Lu Chao, 2016. "The Transition to First Marriage in China, 1966–2008: An Examination of Gender Differences in Education and Hukou Status," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 32(1), pages 129-154, February.
    6. David Monaghan, 2017. "The Impact of Economic Inequality and Gender Parity on Educational Assortative Mating: Evidence from the Luxembourg Income Study," LIS Working papers 607, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    China; educational homogamy; log-linear model;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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