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Labor Market Inequality and Marital Segregation in East Asia

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  • Shoichi Sasaki

    (Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University)

Abstract

This study examines the effects of inequalities in male educational wages and gender-such as the gender wage gap and barriers for labor force participation of female workers-on the labor market. It considers the effects of social infrastructure or public goods on marital segregation in Japan, South Korea, Republic of China, and Taiwan. The theoretical hypothesis that Fernández et al. (2005) build is empirically analyzed using individual data from East Asian Social Survey. The estimation results suggest that wage and gender inequalities in the labor market, such as skill wage premiums for men and full-time rates for married women, significantly affect marital segregation. These results show that policies to decrease inequality in the parental generation can decrease future inequality.

Suggested Citation

  • Shoichi Sasaki, 2018. "Labor Market Inequality and Marital Segregation in East Asia," Discussion Papers 1822, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
  • Handle: RePEc:koe:wpaper:1822
    as

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    File URL: http://www.econ.kobe-u.ac.jp/RePEc/koe/wpaper/2018/1822.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Raquel Fernández & Nezih Guner & John Knowles, 2005. "Love and Money: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis of Household Sorting and Inequality," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 120(1), pages 273-344.
    2. Laura Chadwick & Gary Solon, 2002. "Intergenerational Income Mobility Among Daughters," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 335-344, March.
    3. Michael Kremer, 1997. "How Much does Sorting Increase Inequality?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(1), pages 115-139.
    4. Raquel Fernández & Richard Rogerson, 2001. "Sorting and Long-Run Inequality," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(4), pages 1305-1341.
    5. Christine Schwartz & Robert Mare, 2005. "Trends in educational assortative marriage from 1940 to 2003," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 42(4), pages 621-646, November.
    6. John Ermisch & Marco Francesconi & Thomas Siedler, 2006. "Intergenerational Mobility and Marital Sorting," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(513), pages 659-679, July.
    7. Hongyun Han, 2010. "Trends in educational assortative marriage in China from 1970 to 2000," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 22(24), pages 733-770.
    8. Miki Kohara, 2007. "Is the Full-Time Housewife a Symbol of a Wealthy Family?," Japanese Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(4), pages 25-56.
    9. Florencia Torche, 2010. "Educational assortative mating and economic inequality: A comparative analysis of three Latin American countries," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 47(2), pages 481-502, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Wage premium; skilled workers; gender gap; marital segregation; assortative mating; hypogamy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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