IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/demogr/v47y2010i2p481-502.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Educational assortative mating and economic inequality: A comparative analysis of three Latin American countries

Author

Listed:
  • Florencia Torche

    ()

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Florencia Torche, 2010. "Educational assortative mating and economic inequality: A comparative analysis of three Latin American countries," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 47(2), pages 481-502, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:47:y:2010:i:2:p:481-502
    DOI: 10.1353/dem.0.0109
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1353/dem.0.0109
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Raquel Fernández & Nezih Guner & John Knowles, 2005. "Love and Money: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis of Household Sorting and Inequality," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 120(1), pages 273-344.
    2. Emmanuel Saez, 2005. "Top Incomes in the United States and Canada Over the Twentieth Century," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 3(2-3), pages 402-411, 04/05.
    3. Anthony B. ATKINSON, 2007. "The distribution of earnings in OECD countries," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 146(1-2), pages 41-60, March.
    4. Burtless, Gary, 1999. "Effects of growing wage disparities and changing family composition on the U.S. income distribution," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(4-6), pages 853-865, April.
    5. David De Ferranti & Guillermo E. Perry & Francisco H.G. Ferreira & Michael Walton, 2004. "Inequality in Latin America : Breaking with History?," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15009, December.
    6. Michael Kremer, 1997. "How Much does Sorting Increase Inequality?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(1), pages 115-139.
    7. Dahan, Momi & Gaviria, Alejandro, 2001. "Sibling Correlations and Intergenerational Mobility in Latin America," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 49(3), pages 537-554, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:zbw:rwirep:0261 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Kate H. Choi & Marta Tienda & Deborah Cobb-Clark & Mathias Sinning, 2011. "Immigration and Status Exchange in Australia and the United States," Ruhr Economic Papers 0261, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    3. Choi, Kate H. & Tienda, Marta & Cobb-Clark, Deborah A. & Sinning, Mathias, 2011. "Immigration and Status Exchange in Australia and the United States," IZA Discussion Papers 5750, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Jo Blanden & Robert Haveman & Timothy Smeeding & Kathryn Wilson, 2014. "Intergenerational Mobility in the United States and Great Britain: A Comparative Study of Parent–Child Pathways," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(3), pages 425-449, September.
    5. Lusi Liao & Sasiwimon Warunsiri Paweenawat, 2018. "Educational Assortative Mating and Income Inequality in Thailand," PIER Discussion Papers 92, Puey Ungphakorn Institute for Economic Research, revised Aug 2018.
    6. Abigail Weitzman & Dalton Conley, 2014. "From Assortative to Ashortative Coupling: Men's Height, Height Heterogamy, and Relationship Dynamics in the United States," NBER Working Papers 20402, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. repec:eee:wdevel:v:95:y:2017:i:c:p:231-253 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Helmuth Cremer & Kerstin Roeder, 2017. "Rotten spouses, family transfers, and public goods," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 30(1), pages 141-161, January.
    9. Iñaki Permanyer & Joan García & Albert Esteve, 2013. "The Impact of Educational Homogamy on Isolated Illiteracy Levels," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(6), pages 2209-2225, December.
    10. Shoichi Sasaki, 2018. "Labor Market Inequality and Marital Segregation in East Asia," Discussion Papers 1822, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
    11. Estéfano rubio, 2016. "El diálogo de dos desafíos: evolución y relación de la desigualdad y la escolaridad en Chile," Puntos de Referencia DPP-15, Centro de Estudios Públicos.
    12. Christine Schwartz & Robert Mare, 2012. "The Proximate Determinants of Educational Homogamy: The Effects of First Marriage, Marital Dissolution, Remarriage, and Educational Upgrading," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(2), pages 629-650, May.
    13. Albert Esteve & Robert McCaa & Luis López, 2013. "The Educational Homogamy Gap Between Married and Cohabiting Couples in Latin America," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 32(1), pages 81-102, February.
    14. David Monaghan, 2017. "The Impact of Economic Inequality and Gender Parity on Educational Assortative Mating: Evidence from the Luxembourg Income Study," LIS Working papers 607, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    15. repec:cpt:journl:v::y:2016:i:144:p:61-107 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:47:y:2010:i:2:p:481-502. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.