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An over time analysis on the mechanisms behind the education–health gradients in China

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  • ZHONG, Hai

Abstract

In this paper, we examine the over time changes in the relationship between education and health in the past two decades in China. We do not find a clear education–health gradient in the early 1990s. However, the education–health gradient emerges and steadily grows. We test a number of different theories that may explain the observed trend. We show that the mechanisms behind the education–health gradient in developing countries might be different from those in developed countries, and heterogeneous across health measures, both of which may have some important policy implications.

Suggested Citation

  • ZHONG, Hai, 2015. "An over time analysis on the mechanisms behind the education–health gradients in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 135-149.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:34:y:2015:i:c:p:135-149
    DOI: 10.1016/j.chieco.2015.04.003
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    Keywords

    Education; Health inequality; Education–health gradient; China;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts

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