IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/isu/genres/12008.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Learning About Heterogeneity in Returns to Schooling

Author

Listed:
  • Koop, Gary M
  • Tobias, Justin

Abstract

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) we introduce and estimate various Bayesian hierarchical models that investigate the nature of unobserved heterogeneity in returns to schooling. We consider a variety of possible forms for the heterogeneity, some motivated by previous theoretical and empirical work and some new ones, and let the data decide among the competing specifications. Empirical results indicate that heterogeneity is present in returns to education. Furthermore, we find strong evidence that the heterogeneity follows a continuous rather than discrete distribution, and that bivariate Normality provides a very reasonable description of individual-level heterogeneity in intercepts and returns to schooling.

Suggested Citation

  • Koop, Gary M & Tobias, Justin, 2004. "Learning About Heterogeneity in Returns to Schooling," Staff General Research Papers Archive 12008, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:12008
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Patrawart, Kraiyos, 2008. "Can Equality in Education Be A New Anti-Corruption Tool?: Cross-Country Evidence (1990-2005)," MPRA Paper 9665, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Garth Holloway & Donald Lacombe & James P. LeSage, 2007. "Spatial Econometric Issues for Bio-Economic and Land-Use Modelling," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(3), pages 549-588, September.
    3. repec:eee:labeco:v:48:y:2017:i:c:p:87-104 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Li, Mingliang & Tobias, Justin L., 2011. "Bayesian inference in a correlated random coefficients model: Modeling causal effect heterogeneity with an application to heterogeneous returns to schooling," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 162(2), pages 345-361, June.
    5. Koop, Gary & Tobias, Justin L., 2006. "Semiparametric Bayesian inference in smooth coefficient models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 134(1), pages 283-315, September.
    6. Marianna Belloc & Ugo Pagano, 2008. "Politics-Business Interaction Paths," Working Papers 109, University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Public Economics.
    7. Balestra, Simone & Backes-Gellner, Uschi, 2017. "Heterogeneous returns to education over the wage distribution: Who profits the most?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 89-105.
    8. Tsionas, Efthymios G., 2012. "Maximum likelihood estimation of stochastic frontier models by the Fourier transform," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 170(1), pages 234-248.
    9. Daniel J. Henderson & Andrew Houtenville & Le Wang, 2017. "The Distribution of Returns to Education for People with Disabilities," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 38(3), pages 261-282, September.
    10. Deniz Ozabaci & Daniel Henderson, 2015. "Additive kernel estimates of returns to schooling," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 48(1), pages 227-251, February.
    11. Luca Favero & Andreina Fucci, 2017. "The Erasmus effect on earnings: a panel analysis from Siena," Department of Economics University of Siena 762, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    12. Cui, Yuling & Nahm, Daehoon & Tani, Massimiliano, 2013. "Earnings Differentials and Returns to Education in China, 1995-2008," IZA Discussion Papers 7349, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Henderson, Daniel J. & Polachek, Solomon W. & Wang, Le, 2011. "Heterogeneity in schooling rates of return," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1202-1214.
    14. Simone Balestra & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2013. "Heterogeneous Returns to Education Over Wage Distribution: Who Profits the Most?," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0091, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW), revised Dec 2013.
    15. RĂ©mi Piatek & Pia Pinger, 2016. "Maintaining (Locus of) Control? Data Combination for the Identification and Inference of Factor Structure Models," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(4), pages 734-755, June.
    16. Biewen, Martin & Tapalaga, Madalina, 2017. "Early Tracking, Academic vs. Vocational Training and the Value of 'Second Chance' Options," IZA Discussion Papers 11080, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    17. Joshua C. C. Chan, 2005. "Replication of the results in 'learning about heterogeneity in returns to schooling'," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(3), pages 439-443.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:isu:genres:12008. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Curtis Balmer). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/deiasus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.