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Replication in Labor Economics: Evidence from Data, and What It Suggests

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  • Hamermesh, Daniel S.

    () (Barnard College)

Abstract

Examining the most heavily-cited publications in labor economics from the early 1990s, I show that few of over 3000 articles citing them directly replicates them. They are replicated more frequently using data from other time periods and economies, so that the validity of their central ideas has typically been verified. This pattern of scholarship suggests, beyond the currently required depositing of data and code upon publication, that there is little need for formal mechanisms for replication. The market for scholarship already produces replications of non-laboratory applied research.

Suggested Citation

  • Hamermesh, Daniel S., 2016. "Replication in Labor Economics: Evidence from Data, and What It Suggests," IZA Discussion Papers 10403, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10403
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. ., 2010. "Warranted Growth and the Role of the State," Chapters,in: Strategic Competition, Dynamics, and the Role of the State, chapter 5 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Thomas Herndon & Michael Ash & Robert Pollin, 2014. "Does high public debt consistently stifle economic growth? A critique of Reinhart and Rogoff," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 38(2), pages 257-279.
    3. Card, David & Krueger, Alan B, 1994. "Minimum Wages and Employment: A Case Study of the Fast-Food Industry in New Jersey and Pennsylvania," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 772-793, September.
    4. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2010. "Growth in a Time of Debt," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(2), pages 573-578, May.
    5. Edward P. Lazear, 1990. "Job Security Provisions and Employment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 105(3), pages 699-726.
    6. Joonkyung Ha & Jong-Wha Lee & Lea Sumulong, 2010. "Rebalancing Growth in the Republic of Korea," Macroeconomics Working Papers 22753, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    7. Neal, Derek A & Johnson, William R, 1996. "The Role of Premarket Factors in Black-White Wage Differences," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(5), pages 869-895, October.
    8. Reinhart, Carmen & Rogoff, Kenneth, 2010. "Debt and Growth Revisited," MPRA Paper 24376, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Steven J. Davis & John Haltiwanger, 1992. "Gross Job Creation, Gross Job Destruction, and Employment Reallocation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(3), pages 819-863.
    10. ., 2010. "A Review of the Literature on Growth," Chapters,in: Strategic Competition, Dynamics, and the Role of the State, chapter 3 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    11. Ashenfelter, Orley & Krueger, Alan B, 1994. "Estimates of the Economic Returns to Schooling from a New Sample of Twins," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(5), pages 1157-1173, December.
    12. Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2007. "Viewpoint: Replication in economics," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 40(3), pages 715-733, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Anderson, Richard G., 2017. "Should you choose to do so...: A replication paradigm," Economics Discussion Papers 2017-79, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    2. W. Robert Reed, 2017. "Replication in labor economics," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 413-413, December.
    3. Nicolas Vallois & Dorian Jullien, 2017. "Replication in experimental economics: A historical and quantitative approach focused on public good game experiments," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-01651080, HAL.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    citation analysis; reliability of research; scientific method;

    JEL classification:

    • B21 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Microeconomics
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • B41 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - Economic Methodology

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