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Does Data Disclosure Increase Citations? Empirical Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Leading Economics Journals

Author

Listed:
  • Mark J. McCabe

    (Questrom School of Business, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA)

  • Frank Mueller-Langer

    (European Commission – JRC)

Abstract

Does data disclosure have an impact on citations? Four leading economics journals introduced a data disclosure policy between 2004 and 2006. We use panel data consisting of 17,135 article citing-year observations from 1996 to 2015 for articles published in these journals. Empirical articles that did not disclose data (46% of the sample) serve as a control group. Evidence for a positive open data citation effect is weak (6% and not statistically significant). On the other hand, the citation impacts of publication are substantial and precisely estimated. Pure theory, hybrid and purely empirical articles enjoy citations benefits of 22%, 32% and 44%, respectively. Our pre- and post-publication citation data allow us to identify the citation effects of data disclosure and publication, while controlling for intrinsic article quality.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark J. McCabe & Frank Mueller-Langer, 2019. "Does Data Disclosure Increase Citations? Empirical Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Leading Economics Journals," JRC Working Papers on Digital Economy 2019-02, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
  • Handle: RePEc:ipt:decwpa:201902
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    File URL: https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/sites/default/files/jrc115801.pdf
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Data disclosure; diffusion of knowledge; natural experiment; panel data;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • L17 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Open Source Products and Markets
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • C80 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - General
    • L59 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Other

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