IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ipt/iptwpa/jrc103197.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Framework for assessing the socio-economic impacts of Bt maize cultivation

Author

Listed:

Abstract

Bt maize is the only genetically modified (GM) crop grown in the EU for commercial purposes and so far adopted mainly in Spain. Its cultivation can have a number of socio-economic consequences for farmers, upstream and downstream industries, as well as consumers. The European GMO Socio-Economics Bureau (ESEB) has compiled topics, indicators, methodological guidelines and potential data sources to carry out analyses of these socio-economic effects. This document provides a framework applicable to EU Member States currently growing Bt maize and those potentially cultivating it in the future. Over 30 topics and 100 indicators, which range from farm adoption rates to consumer surplus, have been identified by the ESEB Technical Working Group, which is composed of representatives of Member States and assisted by the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre. Evidence of impacts in the EU already exists for some topics both ex post and ex ante, but for most topics it is very limited. Methodologies have been developed by the scientific community for many of the topics and indicators, from simple partial budget analysis to complex aggregated models. It is concluded that while methodologies are available for many of the topics and indicators, the main constraint is a lack of data.

Suggested Citation

  • Jonas Kathage & Manuel Gómez-Barbero & Emilio Rodríguez-Cerezo, 2016. "Framework for assessing the socio-economic impacts of Bt maize cultivation," JRC Working Papers JRC103197, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
  • Handle: RePEc:ipt:iptwpa:jrc103197
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC103197
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Pascal Tillie & Mauro Vigani & Koen Dillen & Emilio Rodríguez Cerezo, 2012. "Markets for non Genetically Modified Identity Preserved crops and derived products," JRC Working Papers JRC76117, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    2. GianCarlo Moschini, 2015. "In medio stat virtus: coexistence policies for GM and non-GM production in spatial equilibrium," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 42(5), pages 851-874.
    3. Stuart Smyth & William Kerr & Peter W. B. Phillips, 2015. "The Unintended Consequences of Technological Change: Winners and Losers from GM Technologies and the Policy Response in the Organic Food Market," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(6), pages 1-17, June.
    4. GianCarlo Moschini & Harun Bulut & Luigi Cembalo, 2005. "On the Segregation of Genetically Modified, Conventional and Organic Products in European Agriculture: A Multi‐market Equilibrium Analysis," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(3), pages 347-372, December.
    5. Frisvold, George B. & Reeves, Jeanne M., 2008. "The costs and benefits of refuge requirements: The case of Bt cotton," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 87-97, March.
    6. Andreas Gabriel & Klaus Menrad, 2015. "Cost of Coexistence of GM and Non‐GM Products in the Food Supply Chains of Rapeseed Oil and Maize Starch in Germany," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(4), pages 472-490, October.
    7. Wesseler, Justus & Scatasta, Sara & Nillesen, Eleonora, 2007. "The maximum incremental social tolerable irreversible costs (MISTICs) and other benefits and costs of introducing transgenic maize in the EU-15," MPRA Paper 33229, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Hurley, Terrance M. & Babcock, Bruce A. & Hellmich, Richard L., 2001. "Bt Corn And Insect Resistance: An Economic Assessment Of Refuges," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 26(1), pages 1-19, July.
    9. Skevas, Theodoros & Fevereiro, Pedro & Wesseler, Justus, 2010. "Coexistence regulations and agriculture production: A case study of five Bt maize producers in Portugal," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(12), pages 2402-2408, October.
    10. Maria Lusser & Terri Raney & Pascal Tilli & Koen Dillen & Emilio Rodríguez Cerezo, 2013. "International workshop on socio-economic impacts of genetically modified crops co-organised by JRC-IPTS and FAO," JRC Working Papers JRC69363, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    11. Matty Demont & Marie Cerovska & Wim Daems & Koen Dillen & József Fogarasi & Erik Mathijs & František Muška & Josef Soukup & Eric Tollens, 2008. "Ex Ante Impact Assessment under Imperfect Information: Biotechnology in New Member States of the EU," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 59(3), pages 463-486, September.
    12. Matin Qaim, 2009. "The Economics of Genetically Modified Crops," Annual Review of Resource Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 1(1), pages 665-694, September.
    13. Demont, Matty & Dillen, Koen & Daems, Wim & Sausse, Christophe & Tollens, Eric & Mathijs, Erik, 2009. "On the proportionality of EU spatial ex ante coexistence regulations," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 508-518, December.
    14. Elizabeth Nolan & Paulo Santos, 2012. "The Contribution of Genetic Modification to Changes in Corn Yield in the United States," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 94(5), pages 1171-1188.
    15. Groeneveld, Rolf A. & Wesseler, Justus & Berentsen, Paul B.M., 2013. "Dominos in the dairy: An analysis of transgenic maize in Dutch dairy farming," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 107-116.
    16. McBride, William D. & El-Osta, Hisham S., 2002. "Impacts Of The Adoption Of Genetically Engineered Crops On Farm Financial Performance," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 34(1), pages 1-17, April.
    17. Fernandez-Cornejo, Jorge & McBride, William D., 2002. "Adoption Of Bioengineered Crops," Agricultural Economics Reports 33957, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    18. Fernandez-Cornejo, Jorge & Wechsler, Seth James, 2012. "Revisiting the Impact of Bt Corn Adoption by U.S. Farmers," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 41(3), pages 1-14, December.
    19. Jonas Kathage & Manuel Gómez-Barbero & Emilio Rodríguez-Cerezo, 2015. "Framework for the socio-economic analysis of the cultivation of genetically modified crops," JRC Working Papers JRC95572, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:10:p:3392-:d:171627 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    European Union; farm survey; genetically modified crops; genetic engineering; impact assessment; socio-economic analysis; welfare analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • Q11 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Aggregate Supply and Demand Analysis; Prices
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • Q13 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Markets and Marketing; Cooperatives; Agribusiness
    • Q15 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Land Ownership and Tenure; Land Reform; Land Use; Irrigation; Agriculture and Environment

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ipt:iptwpa:jrc103197. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Publication Officer). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ipjrces.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.