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International workshop on socio-economic impacts of genetically modified crops co-organised by JRC-IPTS and FAO

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This JRC Scientific and Technical report provides proceedings of the "International workshop on socio-economic impacts of genetically modified (GM) crops" which was co-organised by JRC-IPTS and FAO in Seville on 23-24 November 2011. JRC-IPTS has been requested to review for policy makers the main findings of scientists active in this field world-wide in co-operation with FAO. The objective of this workshop, which was directed at socio-economic experts from the Competent Authorities of the EU Member States and staff from the EC, was to start the technical discussions between the Member States and the Commission to define factors and indicators allowing a proper capture of the impacts of GMOs in the EU. The workshop covered the following topics: Session 1: Adoption of GM crop varieties and socio-economic impacts on farmers Session 2: Aggregated and global impacts of GM technology in agriculture Session 3: Economics of segregation/coexistence of supply chains Session 4: Socio economic impacts of GM crops: examples of use in decision-making Session 5: Economic compensation, liability issues and institutional framework influencing adoption of GM crops Session 6: Research on consumer attitudes, direct/indirect impacts of GM crops on consumers including health issues Session 7: Looking forward: New GM crops in the pipeline and their possible economic and social impacts

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  • Maria Lusser & Terri Raney & Pascal Tilli & Koen Dillen & Emilio Rodríguez Cerezo, 2013. "International workshop on socio-economic impacts of genetically modified crops co-organised by JRC-IPTS and FAO," JRC Working Papers JRC69363, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
  • Handle: RePEc:ipt:iptwpa:jrc69363
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    File URL: http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC69363
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    Cited by:

    1. Marion Desquilbet & Sylvaine Poret, 2014. "How do GM/non GM coexistence regulations affect markets and welfare?," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 37(1), pages 51-82, February.
    2. Klara Fischer & Elisabeth Ekener-Petersen & Lotta Rydhmer & Karin Edvardsson Björnberg, 2015. "Social Impacts of GM Crops in Agriculture: A Systematic Literature Review," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(7), pages 1-23, July.
    3. Jonas Kathage & Manuel Gómez-Barbero & Emilio Rodríguez-Cerezo, 2016. "Framework for assessing the socio-economic impacts of Bt maize cultivation," JRC Working Papers JRC103197, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Biotechnology; Economic impacts; Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs); coexistence; new technologies; best agricultural practice; agronomy; policy support; standardization; farmer revenues; competitiveness;

    JEL classification:

    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services

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