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Coexistence regulations and agriculture production: A case study of five Bt maize producers in Portugal

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  • Skevas, Theodoros
  • Fevereiro, Pedro
  • Wesseler, Justus

Abstract

In 1998, Genetically Modified (GM) maize entered European Agriculture. After the publication of the European Commission's guidelines on coexistence in 2003, Portugal developed ex-ante regulatory and ex-post tort liability rules on the coexistence of GM and non-GM maize crops. There is an on-going debate on the extent to which the coexistence policies affect adoption. In this study we measure the costs and benefits of planting GM maize as a member of a cooperative. All group members achieved a higher gross margin by planting GM maize rather than non-GM maize on their farms. Group members did not face any ex-post liability costs and had zero ex-ante regulatory costs as they could easily internalize the ex-ante coexistence regulations. The results show that coexistence regulations such as informing neighbors or keeping minimum distances do not necessarily lead to increased production costs provided they are flexible enough.

Suggested Citation

  • Skevas, Theodoros & Fevereiro, Pedro & Wesseler, Justus, 2010. "Coexistence regulations and agriculture production: A case study of five Bt maize producers in Portugal," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(12), pages 2402-2408, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:69:y:2010:i:12:p:2402-2408
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Consmuller, Nicola & Beckmann, Volker & Petrick, Martin, 2012. "Identifying driving factors for the establishment of cooperative GMO-free zones in Germany," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126531, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Mattia C. Mancini & Kent Kovacs & Eric Wailes & Jennie Popp, 2016. "Addressing the Externalities from Genetically Modified Pollen Drift on a Heterogeneous Landscape," Land, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(4), pages 1-18, October.
    3. Groeneveld, Rolf A. & Wesseler, Justus & Berentsen, Paul B.M., 2013. "Dominos in the dairy: An analysis of transgenic maize in Dutch dairy farming," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 107-116.
    4. Areal, Francisco J. & Riesgo, Laura & Gómez-Barbero, Manuel & Rodríguez-Cerezo, Emilio, 2012. "Consequences of a coexistence policy on the adoption of GMHT crops in the European Union," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 401-411.
    5. Ambec, Stefan & Langinier, Corinne & Marcoul, Philippe, 2011. "Spatial Efficiency of Genetically Modified and Organic Crops," LERNA Working Papers 11.18.352, LERNA, University of Toulouse.
    6. Rolf A. Groeneveld & Erik Ansink & Clemens C.M. Van de Wiel & Justus Wesseler, 2011. "Benefits and Costs of Biologically Contained Genetically Modified Tomatoes and Eggplants in Italy and Spain," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(8), pages 1-17, August.
    7. Jonas Kathage & Manuel Gómez-Barbero & Emilio Rodríguez-Cerezo, 2016. "Framework for assessing the socio-economic impacts of Bt maize cultivation," JRC Working Papers JRC103197, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    8. Gray, Emily & Ancev, Tihomir & Drynan, Ross, 2011. "Coexistence of GM and non-GM crops with endogenously determined separation," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(12), pages 2486-2493.
    9. repec:bla:jageco:v:68:y:2017:i:2:p:407-426 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Ivelin Iliev Rizov & Emilio Rodríguez Cerezo, 2013. "European Coexistence Bureau. Best Practice Documents for coexistence of genetically modified crops with conventional and organic farming. 2. Monitoring efficiency of coexistence measures in maize crop," JRC Working Papers JRC85760, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    11. Tosun, Jale & Schaub, Simon, 2015. "To mobilize or not: political attention and the regulation of GMOs," GMCC-15: Seventh GMCC, November 17-20, 2015, Amsterdam, the Netherlands 211493, International Conference on Coexistence between Genetically Modified (GM) and non-GM based Agricultural Supply Chains (GMCC).
    12. Consmuller, Nicola & Beckmann, Volker & Petrick, Martin, 2011. "Towards GMO-free landscapes? Identifying driving factors for the establishment of cooperative GMO-free zones in Germany," 51st Annual Conference, Halle, Germany, September 28-30, 2011 114493, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA).
    13. Wesseler, Justus, 0. "Biotechnologies and agrifood strategies: opportunities, threats and economic implications," Bio-based and Applied Economics Journal, Italian Association of Agricultural and Applied Economics (AIEAA), issue 3.

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