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Impact of alternative information requirements on the coexistence of genetically modified (GM) and non-GM oilseed rape in the EU

Author

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  • Breustedt, Gunnar
  • Latacz-Lohmann, Uwe
  • Müller-Scheeßel, Jörg

Abstract

We use spatial simulation techniques to estimate both cross pollination damages and net producer benefit from genetically modified (GM) oilseed rape under alternative information requirements about individual farmers' cropping plans. Simulations were carried out for two study regions in Germany. The results suggest that, especially in landscapes with small plots, information requirements implemented in most EU Member States may result in inefficient coexistence to the extent that GM farmers lack important information to adjust their cropping plans to non-GM rape farmers' crop choices. We conclude that, in such fragmented landscapes, more comprehensive information requirements which oblige both GM and non-GM farmers to announce their cropping plans can: (1) substantially increase producer benefits, (2) reduce cross pollination damages and dispute and thus (3) contribute to the local diffusion of GM varieties.

Suggested Citation

  • Breustedt, Gunnar & Latacz-Lohmann, Uwe & Müller-Scheeßel, Jörg, 2013. "Impact of alternative information requirements on the coexistence of genetically modified (GM) and non-GM oilseed rape in the EU," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 104-115.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:93:y:2013:i:c:p:104-115 DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2013.04.012
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Coexistence; Genetic modification; Herbicide-tolerant oilseed rape; Public register; Liability; Spatial simulation;

    JEL classification:

    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis
    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities
    • D89 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Other
    • K13 - Law and Economics - - Basic Areas of Law - - - Tort Law and Product Liability; Forensic Economics
    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services

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