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The Long-Term Direct and External Effects of Jewish Expulsions in Nazi Germany

  • Mevlude Akbulut Yuksel


    (Dalhousie University, Halifax)

  • Mutlu Yuksel


    (Dalhousie University, Halifax)

This paper examines the long-term direct and spillover effects of large-scale human capital loss caused by the persecution of Jewish professionals in Nazi Germany. Using region-by-cohort variation in the Jewish population as a quasi-experiment, we find that on average German children who were of school age during the persecutions have fewer years of schooling in adulthood, and are less likely to finish high school or go to college. These results are robust after controlling for regional unemployment and income, wartime destruction, Nazi and Communist Party support, the compulsory schooling reform, migration, urbanization and mortality.

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Paper provided by Households in Conflict Network in its series HiCN Working Papers with number 154.

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Length: 46 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hic:wpaper:154
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