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Early retirement and economic incentives


  • Hernaes,E.

    (University of Oslo, Department of Economics)


In Norway, early retirement programmes have gradually reduced the retirement age from 67 to 62 for a majority of the labour force. Based on micro data for 1990 and 1992, we estimate a competing-risk model with three states: full retirement, partial retirement/part-time work and full-time work. We then use the estimated model in simulations to study how financial incentives can be strengthened to extend working life. Financial incentives, educational background and industry affiliation are found to influence retirement behaviour. For low and medium incomes, the tax system shifts the incentives heavily towards early retirement and, in particular, towards partial retirement combined with part-time work. Copyright 2000 by The editors of the Scandinavian Journal of Economics.
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Suggested Citation

  • Hernaes,E., 1999. "Early retirement and economic incentives," Memorandum 17/1999, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:osloec:1999_017

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Samwick, Andrew A., 1998. "New evidence on pensions, social security, and the timing of retirement," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(2), pages 207-236, November.
    2. John P. Rust, 1990. "Behavior of Male Workers at the End of the Life Cycle: An Empirical Analysis of States and Controls," NBER Chapters,in: Issues in the Economics of Aging, pages 317-382 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Stern, Steven, 1997. "Approximate Solutions to Stochastic Dynamic Programs," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(03), pages 392-405, June.
    4. Blau, David M., 1997. "Social security and the labor supply of older married couples," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 373-418, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Iskhakov, Fedor, 2008. "Dynamic Programming Model of Health and Retirement," Memorandum 03/2008, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    2. Hernaes, Erik & Markussen, Simen & Piggott, John & Vestad, Ola L., 2013. "Does retirement age impact mortality?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 586-598.
    3. Christian Brinch & Erik Hernæs & Steinar Strøm, 2001. "Labour Supply Effects of an Early Retirement Programme," CESifo Working Paper Series 463, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Mona Larsen & Peder J. Pedersen, 2008. "Pathways to early retirement in Denmark, 1984-2000," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 29(5), pages 384-409, August.
    5. Hernæs, Erik & Zhu, Weizhen, 2009. "Pension Entitlements and Wealth Accumulation," Memorandum 12/2007, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    6. Dahl, Svenn-Åge & Nilsen, Øivind Anti & Vaage, Kjell, 2002. "Gender Differences in Early Retirement Behaviour," Working Papers in Economics 02/02, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
    7. Vare, Minna, 2005. "Timing of the Early Retirement Decisions of Farming Couples," 94th Seminar, April 9-10, 2005, Ashford, UK 24412, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    8. Kyrre Stensnes & Nils Martin Stølen, 2007. "Pension Reform in Norway. Microsimulating effects on government expenditures, labour supply incentives and benefit distribution," Discussion Papers 524, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    9. Dennis Fredriksen & Nils Martin Stølen, 2005. "Effects of demographic development, labour supply and pension reforms on the future pension burden," Discussion Papers 418, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    10. Erik Hernæs & Zhiyang Jia & Steinar Strøm, 2007. "Retirement in Non-Cooperative and Cooperative Families," Chapters,in: Ageing and the Labor Market in Japan, chapter 7 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    11. Johnsen, Julian V. & Vaage, Kjell, 2015. "Spouses’ retirement and the take-up of disability pension," Working Papers in Economics 03/15, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
    12. Vestad, Ola Lotherington, 2013. "Labour supply effects of early retirement provision," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 98-109.
    13. Erik Hernæs & Zhiyang Jia & Steinar Strøm, 2003. "Macroeconomic Effects of Sectoral Shocks in Germany, the U.K. and, the U.S," CHILD Working Papers wp04_03, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
    14. Holen, Dag S., 2007. "It Ain't Necessariy So," Memorandum 19/2008, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    15. Vare, Minna, 2005. "Spousal Effect and Timing of Farmers' Early Retirement Decisions," 2005 International Congress, August 23-27, 2005, Copenhagen, Denmark 24696, European Association of Agricultural Economists.

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