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Gender Differences in Early Retirement Behaviour

  • Dahl, Svenn-Åge

    ()

    (SNF, Bergen)

  • Nilsen, Øivind Anti

    ()

    (Norwegian School of Economics)

  • Vaage, Kjell

    ()

    (University of Bergen)

In this paper we analyse early retirement for men and women focusing on family characteristics such as marital status, spouse income and wealth, and spouses' labour market status. The female participation rate is high in Norway, implying that the country is particularly suitable for the study of gender differences in the early retirement behaviour. At our disposal we have administrative data that include information on individuals aged between 55 and 61 years in 1989. The individuals are followed until the end of 1995, with the aim of determining the predictors of different early retirement states. The results of a competing risk model indicate that women are less likely to take early retirement compared to men and that these differences are due to both different characteristics and different behaviour.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 522.

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Length: 36 pages
Date of creation: Jun 2002
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: European Sociological Review, 2003, 19 (2), 179-198; see IZA Reprints 183/03
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp522
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  1. Altonji, Joseph G. & Blank, Rebecca M., 1999. "Race and gender in the labor market," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 48, pages 3143-3259 Elsevier.
  2. Courtney Coile & Jonathan Gruber, 2000. "Social Security and Retirement," NBER Working Papers 7830, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Hernaes, Erik & Sollie, Marte & Strom, Steinar, 2000. " Early Retirement and Economic Incentives," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 102(3), pages 481-502, June.
  4. Peracchi, Franco & Welch, Finis, 1994. "Trends in Labor Force Transitions of Older Men and Women," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 12(2), pages 210-42, April.
  5. Dahl, S.-A., Nilsen, O.A. & Vaage, K., 2000. "Work or Retirement? Exit Routes for Norwegian Elderly," Norway; Department of Economics, University of Bergen 213, Department of Economics, University of Bergen.
  6. Even, William E & Macpherson, David A, 1990. "The Gender Gap in Pensions and Wages," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 72(2), pages 259-65, May.
  7. Bratberg, E. & Holmas, T.H. & Thogersen, O., 2000. "Assessing the Effects of Early Retirement Programs," Papers 4/2000, Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration-.
  8. Meghir, Costas & Whitehouse, Edward, 1997. "Labour market transitions and retirement of men in the UK," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 79(2), pages 327-354, August.
  9. Sveinbjörn Blöndal & Stefano Scarpetta, 1999. "The Retirement Decision in OECD Countries," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 202, OECD Publishing.
  10. William E. Even & David A. Macpherson, 1994. "Gender Differences in Pensions," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(2), pages 555-587.
  11. Regina Riphahn, 1997. "Disability retirement and unemployment - substitute pathways for labour force exit? An empirical test for the case of Germany," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(5), pages 551-561.
  12. Gruber, Jonathan & Wise, David, 1998. "Social Security and Retirement: An International Comparison," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 158-63, May.
  13. Berkovec, James & Stern, Steven, 1991. "Job Exit Behavior of Older Men," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(1), pages 189-210, January.
  14. Vistnes, Jessica Primoff, 1994. "An Empirical Analysis of Married Women's Retirement Decisions," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 47(1), pages 135-55, March.
  15. Killingsworth, Mark R. & Heckman, James J., 1987. "Female labor supply: A survey," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & R. Layard (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 103-204 Elsevier.
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