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Trends in Labor Force Transitions of Older Men and Women

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  • Peracchi, Franco
  • Welch, Finis

Abstract

The authors use the Current Population Survey to describe what they believe are the most salient aspects of labor force behavior of older men and women during the last two decades. First, they show that early retirement has increased dramatically and this trend continued through the 1980s. Second, the authors show that the factors that most sharply distinguish propensities toward early retirement are those usually associated with low wages. Third, they show that trends in reduced participation for older men parallel those for younger men, while a pattern of increasing female participation is to be expected given the behavior of younger cohorts. Copyright 1994 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Peracchi, Franco & Welch, Finis, 1994. "Trends in Labor Force Transitions of Older Men and Women," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 12(2), pages 210-242, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:12:y:1994:i:2:p:210-42
    DOI: 10.1086/298356
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Richard A. Ippolito, 1990. "Toward Explaining Earlier Retirement after 1970," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 43(5), pages 556-569, October.
    2. -, 1988. "Publicaciones CEPAL, ILPES, CELADE, marzo de 1988," Sede de la CEPAL en Santiago (Estudios e Investigaciones) 29275, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    3. John P. Rust, 1989. "A Dynamic Programming Model of Retirement Behavior," NBER Chapters, in: The Economics of Aging, pages 359-404, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Finis Welch, 1993. "Matching the Current Population Surveys," Stata Technical Bulletin, StataCorp LP, vol. 2(12).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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