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A new anatomy of the retirement process in Japan

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  • Shimizutani, Satoshi

Abstract

In Japan, retirement is a gradual process that transpires over a particularly long period of time. Using large scale micro-level datasets from the Survey of Employment of the Elderly compiled by the Japanese government, we provide some stylized facts on the development of retirement behavior since the 1980s and explore factors affecting the individual retirement decision. First, we observed a general declining trend in the proportion of retired individuals aged 55–59 (especially females) while the proportion of retired individuals aged 65–69 (especially males) increased. Second, the survival analysis on actual retirement age shows that those who are more educated are more likely to retire earlier and those who experienced mandatory retirement are less likely. Third, the survival analysis on the expected retirement age shows that individuals who are satisfied with their job in terms of nonmonetary rewards are less likely to retire earlier.

Suggested Citation

  • Shimizutani, Satoshi, 2011. "A new anatomy of the retirement process in Japan," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 141-152.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:japwor:v:23:y:2011:i:3:p:141-152
    DOI: 10.1016/j.japwor.2011.07.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Shimizutani, Satoshi & Oshio, Takashi, 2009. "New Evidence on Initial Transition from Career Job to Retirement in Japan," PIE/CIS Discussion Paper 430, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    2. Takashi Oshio & Satoshi Shimizutani & Akiko Sato Oishi, 2010. "Does Social Security Induce Withdrawal of the Old from the Labor Force and Create Jobs for the Young? The Case of Japan," NBER Chapters,in: Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: The Relationship to Youth Employment, pages 217-241 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Alan L. Gustman & Olivia S. Mitchell & Thomas L. Steinmeier, 1995. "Retirement Measures in the Health and Retirement Study," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30, pages s57-s83.
    4. Satoshi Shimizutani & Izumi Yokoyama, 2006. "Has Japan's Long-term employment Practice Survived? New Evidence Emerging Since the 1990s," Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series d06-182, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    5. Satoshi Shimizutani & Izumi Yokoyama, 2009. "Has Japan's Long-Term Employment Practice Survived? Developments since the 1990S," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 62(3), pages 313-326, April.
    6. ICHIMURA Hidehiko & SHIMIZUTANI Satoshi & HASHIMOTO Hideki, 2009. "JSTAR First Results 2009 Report," Discussion papers 09047, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    7. Takashi Oshio & Akiko Sato Oishi & Satoshi Shimizutani, 2011. "Social Security Reforms And Labour Force Participation Of The Elderly In Japan," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 62(2), pages 248-271, June.
    8. Ruhm, Christopher J, 1990. "Bridge Jobs and Partial Retirement," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(4), pages 482-501, October.
    9. John P. Rust, 1989. "A Dynamic Programming Model of Retirement Behavior," NBER Chapters,in: The Economics of Aging, pages 359-404 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Lumsdaine, Robin L. & Mitchell, Olivia S., 1999. "New developments in the economic analysis of retirement," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 49, pages 3261-3307 Elsevier.
    11. Rebick Marcus E., 1995. "Rewards in the Afterlife: Late Career Job Placements as Incentives in the Japanese Firm," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 1-28, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Olivia S. Mitchell & John W. R. Phillips, 2012. "Retirement in Japan and the United States: Cross-national Comparisons using the Japanese Study of Aging and Retirement (JSTAR) and the U.S. Health and Retirement Study (HRS)," Working Papers wp270, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    2. ICHIMURA Hidehiko & SHIMIZUTANI Satoshi, 2011. "Retirement Process in Japan: New evidence from Japanese Study on Aging and Retirement (JSTAR)," Discussion papers 11080, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    3. Robert Clark & Rikiya Matsukura & Naohiro Ogawa, 2014. "Retirement Transitions In Japan," Discussion Papers 14-013, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    4. Shimizutani, Satoshi & Oshio, Takashi, 2013. "Revisiting the labor supply effect of social security earnings test: New evidence from its elimination and reinstatement in Japan," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 99-111.
    5. Usui, Emiko & Shimizutani, Satoshi & Oshio, Takashi, 2014. "Work Capacity of Older Adults in Japan," CIS Discussion paper series 635, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Retirement; Labor supply of the elderly; Survival analysis; Japan;

    JEL classification:

    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies

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