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Public Pension Benefits Claiming Behavior: New Evidence from the Japanese Study on Aging and Retirement

  • Shimizutani, Satoshi
  • Oshio, Takashi

This paper explores the public pension claiming behavior of the Japanese. First, we perform financial simulations and estimate the expected utility, depicting the typical patterns of pension benefits over a life cycle. We show that the optimal retirement age depends on the beneficiaries’ mortality risk, discount rate, initial wealth, and risk attitude. Second, we use individual-level data from the Japanese Study on Aging and Retirement to examine empirically the determinants of the take-up timing. We find supportive evidence that most of the factors examined in the simulation are indeed significantly associated with early claiming of pension benefits for wage earners.

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File URL: http://hermes-ir.lib.hit-u.ac.jp/rs/bitstream/10086/23240/1/DP573.pdf
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Paper provided by Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University in its series CIS Discussion paper series with number 573.

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Length: 33 p.
Date of creation: Oct 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hit:cisdps:573
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  1. COILE, Courtney & DIAMOND, Peter & GRUBER, Jonathan & JOUSTEN, Alain, 2000. "Delays in claiming social security benefits," CORE Discussion Papers 2000029, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  2. Laurence J. Kotlikoff & Avia Spivak, 1979. "The Family as an Incomplete Annuities Market," NBER Working Papers 0362, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Tullio Jappelli & Jörn-Steffen Pischke & Nicholas S. Souleles, 1998. "Testing For Liquidity Constraints In Euler Equations With Complementary Data Sources," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(2), pages 251-262, May.
  4. Jeffrey R. Brown & Arie Kapteyn & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2011. "Framing Effects and Expected Social Security Claiming Behavior," NBER Working Papers 17018, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Oshio, Takashi & Sato Oishi, Akiko & Shimizutani, Satoshi, 2008. "Social Security Reforms and Labor Force Participation of the Elderly in Japan," PIE/CIS Discussion Paper 407, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  6. Takashi Oshio & Satoshi Shimizutani & Akiko Sato Oishi, 2010. "Does Social Security Induce Withdrawal of the Old from the Labor Force and Create Jobs for the Young? The Case of Japan," NBER Chapters, in: Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: The Relationship to Youth Employment, pages 217-241 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Michael D. Hurd & James P. Smith & Julie M. Zissimopoulos, 2002. "The Effects of Subjective Survival on Retirement and Social Security Claiming," Working Papers wp021, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
  8. repec:fth:pennfi:69 is not listed on IDEAS
  9. ICHIMURA Hidehiko & SHIMIZUTANI Satoshi & HASHIMOTO Hideki, 2009. "JSTAR First Results 2009 Report," Discussion papers 09047, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
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