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Are Japanese Men of Pensionable Age Underemployed or Overemployed?

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Listed:
  • Emiko Usui
  • Satoshi Shimizutani
  • Takashi Oshio

Abstract

We investigate how Japanese men aged 60-74 adjust their workforce attachment after beginning to receive a public pension. Men who were employees at age 54 gradually move to part-time work or retire after beginning to receive pension benefits; those who continue working are more likely to be underemployed. Men self-employed at age 54, however, neither retire nor reduce their working hours even after beginning to receive pension benefits; these men are more likely to be overemployed. In contrast, U.S. men retire or move to part-time when they first claim Social Security; those who continue working as employees after Social Security starts are unlikely to be either over- or underemployed. Therefore, unlike U.S. men, Japanese men are not choosing the optimal pensionable age and labor hours to maximize their intertemporal utility.
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Suggested Citation

  • Emiko Usui & Satoshi Shimizutani & Takashi Oshio, 2016. "Are Japanese Men of Pensionable Age Underemployed or Overemployed?," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 67(2), pages 150-168, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jecrev:v:67:y:2016:i:2:p:150-168
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/jere.12094
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Shimizutani, Satoshi & Oshio, Takashi, 2009. "New Evidence on Initial Transition from Career Job to Retirement in Japan," PIE/CIS Discussion Paper 430, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
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    4. Emiko Usui, 2015. "Occupational gender segregation in an equilibrium search model," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-14, December.
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    6. Takashi Oshio & Akiko Sato Oishi & Satoshi Shimizutani, 2011. "Social Security Reforms And Labour Force Participation Of The Elderly In Japan," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 62(2), pages 248-271, June.
    7. Tsunao Okumura & Emiko Usui, 2014. "The effect of pension reform on pension-benefit expectations and savings decisions in Japan," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(14), pages 1677-1691, May.
    8. Joseph G. Altonji & Christina H. Paxson, 1992. "Labor Supply, Hours Constraints, and Job Mobility," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 27(2), pages 256-278.
    9. Usui, Emiko, 2009. "Wages, non-wage characteristics, and predominantly male jobs," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 52-63, January.
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    13. Emiko Usui & Satoshi Shimizutani & Takashi Oshio, 2016. "Health Capacity to Work at Older Ages: Evidence from Japan," NBER Chapters,in: Social Security Programs and Retirement Around the World: The Capacity to Work at Older Ages, pages 219-241 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    15. Joseph G. Altonji & Emiko Usui, 2007. "Work Hours, Wages, and Vacation Leave," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 60(3), pages 408-428, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Emiko Usui & Satoshi Shimizutani & Takashi Oshio, 2016. "Health Capacity to Work at Older Ages: Evidence from Japan," NBER Chapters,in: Social Security Programs and Retirement Around the World: The Capacity to Work at Older Ages, pages 219-241 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Oshio, Takashi & Usui, Emiko, 2017. "The effects of providing eldercare on daughters’ employment and mental health in Japan," CIS Discussion paper series 661, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    3. Nishimura, Yoshinori, 2016. "Did Government Intervention on Firm’s Employment Policies Have an Effect on the Employment of Elderly Workers?," MPRA Paper 73444, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions

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