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Resisting Economic Integration when Industry Location is Uncertain

This paper analyses the political determination of transportation costs in a new economic geography model. In a benchmark case with certainty about where agglomeration takes place, a majority of voters favour economic integration and the resulting equilibrium is an industrialised core and a de-industrialised periphery. Allowing for uncertainty, a high level of trade costs may win the election and maintain the initial distribution of industry. The reason is that a coalition of risk-averse immobile factors of production votes for the status quo due to uncertainty about which region will attract industry if economic integration is pursued. Finally, the standard view that agglomeration is unambiguously beneficial to residents in the industrial centre is challenged by introducing costs of undertaking economic integration.

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File URL: http://project.nek.lu.se/publications/workpap/Papers/WP06_22.pdf
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Paper provided by Lund University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 2006:22.

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Length: 31 pages
Date of creation: 16 Nov 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:lunewp:2006_022
Note: This paper replaces WP 2005:32 "Determining the Level of Transportation Costs in the Core-Periphery Model: a Majority Voting Approach"
Contact details of provider: Postal: Department of Economics, School of Economics and Management, Lund University, Box 7082, S-220 07 Lund,Sweden
Phone: +46 +46 222 0000
Fax: +46 +46 2224613
Web page: http://www.nek.lu.se/en

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  27. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:18:y:2006:i:5:p:1-7 is not listed on IDEAS
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