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An analytically solvable core-periphery model


  • Rikard Forslid
  • Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano


We develop an analytically solvable version of the central model of 'new economic geography', the so called core-periphery model by Krugman. While the modified model reproduces all the appealing features of the original one, it also allows us to obtain additional analytical results that are out of reach in Krugman's set-up. First, we are able to assess the exact number of equilibria and their global stability properties. Second, we are able to investigate the implications of exogenous asymmetries between countries. This is achieved by introducing heterogeneity between high-skill mobile and low-skill immobile workers, which may also be an empirically attractive property. Copyright 2003, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Rikard Forslid & Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano, 2003. "An analytically solvable core-periphery model," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 3(3), pages 229-240, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jecgeo:v:3:y:2003:i:3:p:229-240

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    References listed on IDEAS

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