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Labour Market Integration, Human Capital Formation, and Mobility

Author

Listed:
  • Alexander Haupt

    (Plymouth University and CESifo)

  • Silke Uebelmesser

    (School of Economics and Business Administration, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, and CESifo)

Abstract

In this paper, we analyse the implications of labour market integration in a two-region model with local human capital externalities and congestion eects. We show that integration can be a double-edged sword. Integration and the ensuing agglomeration of skilled labour can reduce 'real' income in both regions. Even if there is a 'winning' region, human capital and real income in the two regions together might decline (but need not). However, integration can increase total real income even if it depresses human capital formation. We further explore how the degree of labour mobility and the strength of the congestion eects shape the impact of integration on human capital and income.

Suggested Citation

  • Alexander Haupt & Silke Uebelmesser, 2014. "Labour Market Integration, Human Capital Formation, and Mobility," Jena Economic Research Papers 2014-020, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
  • Handle: RePEc:jrp:jrpwrp:2014-020
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    File URL: http://www2.wiwi.uni-jena.de/Papers/jerp2014/wp_2014_020.pdf
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Human capital; migration; labour market integration; agglomeration;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)

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