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Strengthening teachers in disadvantaged schools: Evidence from an intervention in Sweden’s poorest city districts

Author

Listed:
  • Hall, Caroline

    () (IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy)

  • Lundin, Martin

    () (IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy)

  • Sibbmark, Kristina

    () (IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy)

Abstract

Children growing up in disadvantaged neighborhoods tend to perform significantly worse in school compared to children growing up under more favorable circumstances. We examine the impact of a three-year program (“Coaching for Teaching”) targeted at ten poorly performing lower secondary schools in Sweden’s most disadvantaged city districts. The aim of the intervention was to strengthen the teachers’ professional development, e.g. through coaching and further training, and thereby enhance student performance. We use a difference-in-differences design and rich register data to estimate effects on several educational outcomes. Our results show a large and statistically significant positive impact on student performance on standardized tests in English language. Estimates for test results in math are also positive and large, but not statistically significant; the same applies to GPA and admission to upper secondary school. For test scores in Swedish language there is no indication of improvement. An analysis of a survey of pupils supports the idea that the teaching as well as the classroom climate improved due to the intervention. Taken together, the program seems to have generated rather promising results in the short run.

Suggested Citation

  • Hall, Caroline & Lundin, Martin & Sibbmark, Kristina, 2018. "Strengthening teachers in disadvantaged schools: Evidence from an intervention in Sweden’s poorest city districts," Working Paper Series 2018:26, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:ifauwp:2018_026
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    4. repec:mpr:mprres:4761 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Raj Chetty & John N. Friedman & Nathaniel Hilger & Emmanuel Saez & Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach & Danny Yagan, 2011. "How Does Your Kindergarten Classroom Affect Your Earnings? Evidence from Project Star," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 126(4), pages 1593-1660.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Education; disadvantaged schools; lower secondary school; social background; teachers; professional development; student performance; government policy;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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