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Enterprise-related training and poaching externalities

  • Alexandre Léné

    ()

    (CLERSE - Centre lillois d'études et de recherches sociologiques et économiques - CNRS : UMR8019 - Université des Sciences et Technologies de Lille - Lille I)

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    Labour poaching is a potential problem in work-linked training systems. Once trained, young people can be poached by rival firms, which threatened the training firm's investment. A distinction is made between two types of workforce poaching. It is shown that it may be rational for some firms to train young people, even if they then lose part of their workforce. However, this situation is not socially optimal: it does not exclude underinvestment or skilled labour shortages. This may justify government intervention. However, the introduction of subsidies can have perverse effects.

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    Paper provided by HAL in its series Post-Print with number halshs-00150509.

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    Date of creation: Sep 2002
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    Publication status: Published - Presented, 14th European Association of Labour Economists Conference, 2002, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, France
    Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00150509
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: http://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00150509/en/
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