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The impact of economic geography on wages: Disentangling the channels of influence

Listed author(s):
  • Laura Hering

    ()

    (CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - UP1 - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Sandra Poncet

    ()

    (CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - UP1 - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

This paper evaluates the role of economic geography in explaining regional wages in China. It investigates the extent to which market proximity can explain the evolution of wages, and through which channels. We construct a complete indicator of market access at the provincial level from data on domestic and international trade flows; this is introduced in a simultaneous-equations system to identify the direct and indirect effect of market access on wages. The estimation results for 29 Chinese provinces over 1995-2002 suggest that access to sources of demand is indeed an important factor shaping regionalwage dynamics in China. We investigate three channels through which market access might influence wages beside direct transport-cost savings: export performance, and human and physical capital accumulation. A fair share of benefits seems to come from enhanced export performance and greater accumulation of physical capital. The main source of influence of market access remains direct transport costs.

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File URL: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00633816/document
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Paper provided by HAL in its series Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) with number hal-00633816.

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Date of creation: 2009
Publication status: Published in China Economic Review, Elsevier, 2009, 20 (1), pp.1-14. <10.1016/j.chieco.2008.08.002>
Handle: RePEc:hal:cesptp:hal-00633816
DOI: 10.1016/j.chieco.2008.08.002
Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00633816
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