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Agriculture, incomes, and gender in Latin America by 2050: An assessment of climate change impacts and household resilience for Brazil, Mexico, and Peru:

Author

Listed:
  • Andersen, Lykke E.
  • Breisinger, Clemens
  • Mason d'Croz, Daniel
  • Jemio, Luis Carlos
  • Ringler, Claudia
  • Robertson, Richard D.
  • Verner, Dorte
  • Wiebelt, Manfred

Abstract

This report has been prepared in response to growing concerns about the impacts of climate change on Latin American economies, agriculture, and people. Findings suggest that because of the climate change impacts on agricultural production (yield change) and international food prices, unless proper mitigation measures are implemented, by 2050 Brazil and Mexico may face accumulated economic loses between US$ 272.7 billion and US$ 550.6 billion and between US$ 91.0 billion and US$ 194.7, respectively. Peru, with a different productive structure, may face both economic gain and loss (a gain of US$11.0 billion against a loss of US$ 43.3 billion).

Suggested Citation

  • Andersen, Lykke E. & Breisinger, Clemens & Mason d'Croz, Daniel & Jemio, Luis Carlos & Ringler, Claudia & Robertson, Richard D. & Verner, Dorte & Wiebelt, Manfred, 2014. "Agriculture, incomes, and gender in Latin America by 2050: An assessment of climate change impacts and household resilience for Brazil, Mexico, and Peru:," IFPRI discussion papers 1390, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1390
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lykke E. Andersen & Dorte Verner & Manfred Wiebelt, 2017. "Gender and Climate Change in Latin America: An Analysis of Vulnerability, Adaptation and Resilience Based on Household Surveys," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(7), pages 857-876, October.
    2. Christoph Müller & Richard D. Robertson, 2014. "Projecting future crop productivity for global economic modeling," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 45(1), pages 37-50, January.
    3. Lykke E. Andersen & Soraya Román & Dorte Verner, 2010. "Social Impacts of Climate Change in Brazil: A municipal level analysis of the effects of recent and future climate change on income, health and inequality," Development Research Working Paper Series 08/2010, Institute for Advanced Development Studies.
    4. Lykke Andersen & Marcelo Cardona, 2013. "Building Resilience against Adverse Shocks: What are the determinants of vulnerability and resilience?," Development Research Working Paper Series 02/2013, Institute for Advanced Development Studies.
    5. Andersen, Lykke E. & Suxo, Addy & Verner, Dorte, 2009. "Social impacts of climate change in Peru : a district level analysis of the effects of recent and future climate change on human development and inequality," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5091, The World Bank.
    6. Wiebelt, Manfred & Breisinger, Clemens & Ecker, Olivier & Al-Riffai, Perrihan & Robertson, Richard & Thiele, Rainer, 2013. "Compounding food and income insecurity in Yemen: Challenges from climate change," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 77-89.
    7. Manfred Wiebelt & Perrihan Al-Riffai & Clemens Breisinger & Richard Robertson, 2015. "Who bears the costs of climate change? evidence from Tunisia," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 49(2), pages 1-21, April-Jun.
    8. Alejandro Lopez-Feldman, 2013. "Climate change, agriculture, and poverty: A household level analysis for rural Mexico," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(2), pages 1126-1139.
    9. Dorte Verner & Clemens Breisinger, 2013. "Economics of Climate Change in the Arab World : Case Studies from the Syrian Arab Republic, Tunisia, and the Republic of Yemen," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13124.
    10. Richard Robertson & Gerald Nelson & Timothy Thomas & Mark Rosegrant, 2013. "Incorporating Process-Based Crop Simulation Models into Global Economic Analyses," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 95(2), pages 228-235.
    11. Lykke E. Andersen & Dorte Verner, 2010. "Social Impacts of Climate Change in Mexico: A municipality level analysis of the effects of recent and future climate change on human development and inequality," Development Research Working Paper Series 09/2010, Institute for Advanced Development Studies.
    12. Dorte Verner, 2012. "Adaptation to a Changing Climate in the Arab Countries : A Case for Adaptation Governance and Leadership in Building Climate Resilience," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 12216.
    13. Andersen, Lykke E. & Verner, Dorte, 2010. "Social impacts of climate change in Chile : a municipal level analysis of the effects of recent and future climate change on human development and inequality," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5170, The World Bank.
    14. Breisinger, Clemens & Diao, Xinshen, 2008. "Economic transformation in theory and practice: What are the messages for Africa?," IFPRI discussion papers 797, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    15. Estrada, Francisco & Tol, Richard S. J. & Gay-García, Carlos, 2011. "A Critique of The Economics of Climate Change in Mexico," Papers WP408, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    16. Clemens Breisinger & Tingju Zhu & Perrihan Al Riffai & Gerald Nelson & Richard Robertson & Jose Funes & Dorte Verner, 2013. "Economic Impacts Of Climate Change In Syria," Climate Change Economics (CCE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 4(01), pages 1-30.
    17. Ludena, Carlos E. & Mejia, Carla, 2012. "Climate Change, Agricultural Productivity and its Impacts on the Food Industry: A General Equilibrium Analysis," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126851, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
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    Cited by:

    1. Manfred Wiebelt & Perrihan Al-Riffai & Clemens Breisinger & Richard Robertson, 2015. "Who bears the costs of climate change? evidence from Tunisia," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 49(2), pages 1-21, April-Jun.
    2. Luis Carlos Jemio & Lykke E. Andersen & Clemens Breisinger & Manfred Wiebelt, 2015. "An agriculture-focused, regionally disaggregated SAM for Mexico 2008," Development Research Working Paper Series 02/2015, Institute for Advanced Development Studies.

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    Keywords

    Economics; Macroeconomics; Agriculture; Climate change; Food prices; Gender; Women; productivity; income; households;
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