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Banking Across Borders With Heterogeneous Banks

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  • Friederike Niepmann

Abstract

This paper develops a model of banking across borders where banks differ in their efficiencies that can replicate key patterns in the data. More efficient banks are more likely to have assets, liabilities and affiliates abroad and have larger foreign operations. Banks are more likely to be active in countries that have less efficient domestic banks, are bigger and more open to foreign entry. In the model, banking sector integration leads to bank exit and entry and convergence in the return on loans and funding costs across countries. Bank heterogeneity matters for the associated welfare gains. Results suggest that differences in bank efficiencies across countries drive banking across borders, that fixed costs are crucial for foreign bank operations and that globalization makes larger banks even larger.

Suggested Citation

  • Friederike Niepmann, 2016. "Banking Across Borders With Heterogeneous Banks," International Finance Discussion Papers 1177, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgif:1177
    DOI: 10.17016/IFDP.2016.1177
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    File URL: http://www.federalreserve.gov/econresdata/ifdp/2016/files/ifdp1177.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Cacciatore, Matteo & Ghironi, Fabio & Stebunovs, Viktors, 2015. "The domestic and international effects of interstate U.S. banking," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(2), pages 171-187.
    2. Niepmann, Friederike, 2015. "Banking across borders," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(2), pages 244-265.
    3. repec:wly:ijfiec:v:24:y:2019:i:1:p:54-79 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Daniel Carvalho, 2019. "Financial integration and the Great Leveraging," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(1), pages 54-79, January.
    5. Poelhekke, Steven, 2015. "Do global banks facilitate foreign direct investment?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 25-46.
    6. Chakraborty, Indraneel & Hai, Rong & Holter, Hans A. & Stepanchuk, Serhiy, 2017. "The real effects of financial (dis)integration: A multi-country equilibrium analysis of Europe," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 28-45.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cross-border banking ; Heterogeneity ; Multinational banks ; Trade in services;

    JEL classification:

    • F12 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Models of Trade with Imperfect Competition and Scale Economies; Fragmentation
    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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