IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/bos/wpaper/wp2019-001.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

What are the consequences of global banking for the international transmission of shocks? A quantitative analysis∗

Author

Listed:
  • Jose L. Fillat

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Boston)

  • Stefania Garetto

    (Boston University, CEPR, and NBER)

  • Arthur V. Smith

    (Boston University)

Abstract

The global financial crisis of 2008 was followed by a wave of regulatory reforms that affected large banks, especially those with a global presence. These reforms were reactive to the crisis. In this paper we propose a structural model of global banking that can be used proactively to perform counterfactual analysis on the effects of alternative regulatory policies. The structure of the model mimics the US regulatory framework and highlights the organizational choices that banks face when entering a foreign market: branching versus subsidiarization. When calibrated to match moments from a sample of European banks, the model is able to replicate the response of the US banking sector to the European sovereign debt crisis. Our counterfactual analysis suggests that pervasive subsidiarization, higher capital requirements, or ad hoc monetary policy interventions would have mitigated the effects of the crisis on US lending.

Suggested Citation

  • Jose L. Fillat & Stefania Garetto & Arthur V. Smith, 2018. "What are the consequences of global banking for the international transmission of shocks? A quantitative analysis∗," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series WP2019-01, Boston University - Department of Economics, revised Oct 2018.
  • Handle: RePEc:bos:wpaper:wp2019-001
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.bu.edu/econ/files/2019/01/FGS_18-1.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jose M Berrospide & Ricardo Correa & Linda S Goldberg & Friederike Niepmann, 2017. "International Banking and Cross-Border Effects of Regulation: Lessons from the United States," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 13(2), pages 435-476, March.
    2. Temesvary, Judit & Ongena, Steven & Owen, Ann L., 2018. "A global lending channel unplugged? Does U.S. monetary policy affect cross-border and affiliate lending by global U.S. banks?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 50-69.
    3. Ricardo Correa & Horacio Sapriza & Andrei Zlate, 2012. "Liquidity shocks, dollar funding costs, and the bank lending channel during the European sovereign crisis," International Finance Discussion Papers 1059, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    4. Timothy Dunne & J. Bradford Jensen & Mark J. Roberts, 2009. "Introduction to "Producer Dynamics: New Evidence from Micro Data"," NBER Chapters, in: Producer Dynamics: New Evidence from Micro Data, pages 1-12, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Danisewicz, Piotr & Reinhardt, Dennis & Sowerbutts, Rhiannon, 2017. "On a tight leash: Does bank organizational structure matter for macroprudential spillovers?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 174-194.
    6. Claessens, Stijn & Demirguc-Kunt, Asl[iota] & Huizinga, Harry, 2001. "How does foreign entry affect domestic banking markets?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 891-911, May.
    7. Jonathan Fiechter & Ms. Inci Ötker & Ms. Anna Ilyina & Michael Hsu & Mr. Andre O Santos & Jay Surti, 2011. "Subsidiaries or Branches: Does One Size Fit All?," IMF Staff Discussion Notes 2011/004, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Nicola Cetorelli & Linda S Goldberg, 2011. "Global Banks and International Shock Transmission: Evidence from the Crisis," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 59(1), pages 41-76, April.
    9. repec:lmu:muenar:20226 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Mark Egan & Ali Hortaçsu & Gregor Matvos, 2017. "Deposit Competition and Financial Fragility: Evidence from the US Banking Sector," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(1), pages 169-216, January.
    11. Eric S. Rosengren & Joe Peek, 2000. "Collateral Damage: Effects of the Japanese Bank Crisis on Real Activity in the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(1), pages 30-45, March.
    12. de Blas, Beatriz & Russ, Katheryn Niles, 2013. "All banks great, small, and global: Loan pricing and foreign competition," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 4-24.
    13. Timothy Dunne & J. Bradford Jensen & Mark J. Roberts, 2009. "Producer Dynamics: New Evidence from Micro Data," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number dunn05-1, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Albertazzi, Ugo & Cimadomo, Jacopo & Maffei-Faccioli, Nicolò, 2021. "Foreign banks and the doom loop," Working Paper Series 2540, European Central Bank.
    2. Chenzi Xu, 2022. "Reshaping Global Trade: The Immediate and Long-Run Effects of Bank Failures [“Shift-Share Designs: Theory and Inference,”]," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 137(4), pages 2107-2161.
    3. Pierre-Richard Agénor & Timothy P. Jackson & Luiz Pereira da Silva, 2020. "Cross-Border Regulatory Spillovers and Macroprudential Policy Coordination," Working Papers 202028, University of Liverpool, Department of Economics.
    4. Iñaki Aldasoro & John Caparusso & Yingyuan Chen, 2022. "Global banks' local presence: a new lens," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, March.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. José Fillat & Stefania Garetto & Arthur V. Smith, 2018. "What are the consequences of global banking for the international transmission of shocks?: a quantitative analysis," Working Papers 18-11, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    2. Jose L. Fillat & Stefania Garetto & Arthur V. Smith, 2018. "What are the consequences of global banking for the international transmission of shocks? A quantitative analysis∗," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series dp-303, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    3. Jose Fillat & Arthur Smith & Stefania Garetto, 2018. "To Branch or not to Branch? A Quantitative Evaluation of the Consequences of Global Banks’ Organization," 2018 Meeting Papers 1079, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    4. Stefania Garetto & Martin Goetz & Jose Fillat, 2014. "Global Banks' Dynamics and the International Transmission of Shocks," 2014 Meeting Papers 1333, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Stijn Claessens, 2017. "Global Banking: Recent Developments and Insights from Research," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 21(4), pages 1513-1555.
    6. Judit Temesvary & Andrew Wei, 2021. "Domestic Lending and the Pandemic: How Does Banks' Exposure to Covid-19 Abroad Affect Their Lending in the United States?," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2021-056r1, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), revised 17 Nov 2021.
    7. Daniel Belton & Leonardo Gambacorta & Sotirios Kokas & Raoul Minetti, 2023. "Foreign Banks, Liquidity Shocks, and Credit Stability," Review of Corporate Finance Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(1), pages 131-169.
    8. Jonathon Adams‐Kane & Julián A. Caballero & Jamus Jerome Lim, 2017. "Foreign Bank Behavior during Financial Crises," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 49(2-3), pages 351-392, March.
    9. Michael Brei & Carlos Winograd, 2018. "Credit risk of foreign bank branches and subsidiaries in Argentina and Uruguay," EconomiX Working Papers 2018-12, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    10. Caroline Mehigan, 2016. "Foreign Bank Identity: Does it Matter for Credit Growth?," Trinity Economics Papers tep0716, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    11. Cetorelli, Nicola & Goldberg, Linda S., 2012. "Liquidity management of U.S. global banks: Internal capital markets in the great recession," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 299-311.
    12. Cornelia Kerl & Friederike Niepmann, 2014. "What determines the composition of international bank flows?," Staff Reports 681, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    13. Stumpner, Sebastian, 2019. "Trade and the geographic spread of the great recession," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 169-180.
    14. Stijn Claessens & Neeltje van Horen, 2015. "The Impact of the Global Financial Crisis on Banking Globalization," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 63(4), pages 868-918, November.
    15. Claudia M Buch & Linda S Goldberg, 2015. "International Banking and Liquidity Risk Transmission: Lessons from Across Countries," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 63(3), pages 377-410, November.
    16. Takáts, Előd & Temesvary, Judit, 2020. "The currency dimension of the bank lending channel in international monetary transmission," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 125(C).
    17. Jarko Fidrmuc & Svatopluk Kapounek, 2020. "The Risks and Financial Vulnerability of Foreign Bank Ownership in CEECs: Evidence from Exchange Rate Depreciation after the Financial Crisis," Eastern European Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 58(1), pages 34-48, January.
    18. Paola Bongini & Małgorzata Iwanicz-Drozdowska & Paweł Smaga & Bartosz Witkowski, 2017. "Financial Development and Economic Growth: The Role of Foreign-Owned Banks in CESEE Countries," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 9(3), pages 1-25, March.
    19. Mary M. Everett, 2015. "International liquidity shocks and the European sovereign debt crisis: Was euro area unconventional monetary policy successful?," FIW Working Paper series 143, FIW.
    20. Eguren-Martin, Fernando & Ossandon Busch, Matias & Reinhardt, Dennis, 2018. "Global banks and synthetic funding: the benefits of foreign relatives," Bank of England working papers 762, Bank of England, revised 27 Sep 2019.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    global banks; banking regulation; shock transmission.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F12 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Models of Trade with Imperfect Competition and Scale Economies; Fragmentation
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bos:wpaper:wp2019-001. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Program Coordinator (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/decbuus.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service. RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.