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Credit and the Labor Share: Evidence from U.S. States

Author

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  • Leblebicioglu, Asli

    () (University of Texas at Dallas)

  • Weinberger, Ariel

    (University of Oklahoma)

Abstract

We analyze the role of credit markets in explaining the changes in the U.S. labor share by evaluating the effects of state-level banking deregulation, which resulted in improved access to cheaper credit. Utilizing a difference-in-differences strategy, we provide causal evidence showing labor share declined following the interstate banking deregulation. We show that the lower cost of credit, increase in the availability of credit, and greater bank competition in each state are mechanisms that led to the decline in the labor share. We use this evidence to obtain the elasticity of labor share with respect to borrowing costs, which itself is informative about the aggregate elasticity of substitution between capital and labor. Finally, we focus on manufacturing and services to show that the impact of banking deregulation is particularly important in capital intensive and external finance dependent industries.

Suggested Citation

  • Leblebicioglu, Asli & Weinberger, Ariel, 2017. "Credit and the Labor Share: Evidence from U.S. States," Globalization Institute Working Papers 326, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:feddgw:326
    DOI: 10.24149/gwp326
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jith Jayaratne & Philip E. Strahan, 1996. "The Finance-Growth Nexus: Evidence from Bank Branch Deregulation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(3), pages 639-670.
    2. Maya Eden & Paul Gaggl, 2018. "On the Welfare Implications of Automation," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 29, pages 15-43, July.
    3. Nicola Cetorelli & Philip E. Strahan, 2006. "Finance as a Barrier to Entry: Bank Competition and Industry Structure in Local U.S. Markets," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 61(1), pages 437-461, February.
    4. Kandilov, Ivan T. & Leblebicio─člu, Asli & Petkova, Neviana, 2016. "The impact of banking deregulation on inbound foreign direct investment: Transaction-level evidence from the United States," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 138-159.
    5. Cacciatore, Matteo & Ghironi, Fabio & Stebunovs, Viktors, 2015. "The domestic and international effects of interstate U.S. banking," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(2), pages 171-187.
    6. Matthew Rognlie, 2015. "Deciphering the Fall and Rise in the Net Capital Share: Accumulation or Scarcity?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 46(1 (Spring), pages 1-69.
    7. Yuliya Demyanyk & Charlotte Ostergaard & Bent E. Sorensen, 2007. "Banking deregulation helps small business owners stabilize their income," The Regional Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Apr, pages 10-11.
    8. Freeman, Donald G., 2002. "Did state bank branching deregulation produce large growth effects?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 75(3), pages 383-389, May.
    9. Nicolas Vincent & Matthias Kehrig, 2017. "Growing Productivity without Growing Wages: The Micro-Level Anatomy of the Aggregate Labor Share Decline," 2017 Meeting Papers 739, Society for Economic Dynamics.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Grossman, Gene M. & Helpman, Elhanan & Oberfield, Ezra & Sampson, Thomas, 2017. "The productivity slowdown and the declining labor share: a neoclassical exploration," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86597, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Gene Grossman & Elhanan Helpman & Ezra Oberfield & Thomas Sampson, 2018. "The Productivity Slowdown and the Declining Labor Share," 2018 Meeting Papers 169, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • E25 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Aggregate Factor Income Distribution
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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