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Labor market polarization and international macroeconomic dynamics

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  • Mandelman, Federico S.

    () (Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta)

Abstract

During the last thirty years, labor markets in advanced economies were characterized by their remarkable polarization. As job opportunities in middle-skill occupations disappeared, employment opportunities concentrated in the highest- and lowest-wage occupations. I develop a two-country stochastic growth model that incorporates trade in tasks, rather than in goods, and reveal that this setup can replicate the observed polarization in the United States. This polarization was not a steady process: the relative employment share of each skill group fluctuated significantly over short-to-medium horizons. I show that the domestic and international aggregate shocks estimated within this framework can rationalize such employment dynamics while providing a good fit to the macroeconomic data. The model is estimated with employment data for different skills groups and trade-weighted macroeconomic indicators.

Suggested Citation

  • Mandelman, Federico S., 2013. "Labor market polarization and international macroeconomic dynamics," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2013-17, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedawp:2013-17
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrei Zlate & Federico Mandelman, 2013. "Offshoring, Low-skilled Immigration and Labor Market Polarization," 2013 Meeting Papers 1073, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Zlate, Andrei, 2016. "Offshore production and business cycle dynamics with heterogeneous firms," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 34-49.
    3. Mine Senses & Andrei Zlate & Christopher Kurz, 2017. "All Shook Up: International Trade and Firm-level Volatility," 2017 Meeting Papers 851, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    labor market polarization; international business cycles; heterogeneous agents; stochastic growth; two-country models;

    JEL classification:

    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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