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Dispersion of Human Capital and Economic Growth

  • Jungsoo Park

Based on a theoretical consideration of human capital production technology, this study empirically investigates the growth implication of dispersion of population distribution in terms of educational attainment levels. Based on a pooled 5-year interval time-series data set of 94 developed and developing countries for 1960 to 1995, the study finds that dispersion index as well as average index of human capital positively influences productivity growth. Given limited social resources for human capital investment, the finding implies that education policy that creates more dispersion in the human capital will promote grow

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Paper provided by Econometric Society in its series Econometric Society 2004 Far Eastern Meetings with number 526.

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Date of creation: 11 Aug 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ecm:feam04:526
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  12. Benhabib, Jess & Spiegel, Mark M., 1994. "The role of human capital in economic development evidence from aggregate cross-country data," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 143-173, October.
  13. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why Do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output per Worker than Others?," NBER Working Papers 6564, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  20. Pritchett, Lant, 1996. "Where has all the education gone?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1581, The World Bank.
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  26. Kyriacou, George A., 1991. "Level and Growth Effects of Human Capital: A Cross-Country Study of the Convergence Hypothesis," Working Papers 91-26, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
  27. Thomas, Vinod & Wang, Yan & Fan, Xibo, 2001. "Measuring education inequality - Gini coefficients of education," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2525, The World Bank.
  28. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output Per Worker than Others?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(1), pages 83-116.
  29. Winegarden, C R, 1979. "Schooling and Income Distribution: Evidence from International Data," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 46(181), pages 83-87, February.
  30. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
  31. Birdsall, Nancy & Londono, Juan Luis, 1997. "Asset Inequality Matters: An Assessment of the World Bank's Approach to Poverty Reduction," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(2), pages 32-37, May.
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