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Human Capital and Convergence in a Non-Scale R&D Growth Model

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  • Chris Papageorgiou, 2002. "Human Capital and Convergence in a Non-Scale R&D Growth Model," Departmental Working Papers 2002-10, Department of Economics, Louisiana State University.
  • Handle: RePEc:lsu:lsuwpp:2002-10
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    Cited by:

    1. Fofack, Hippolyte, 2008. "Technology trap and poverty trap in Sub-Saharan Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4582, The World Bank.
    2. Anusua Datta & Hamid Mohtadi, 2006. "Endogenous Imitation and Technology Absorption in a Model of North-South Trade," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(4), pages 431-459.
    3. Fofack, Hippolyte, 2009. "Determinants of globalization and growth prospects for Sub-Saharan African countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5019, The World Bank.

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