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The Asian Miracle and Modern Growth Theory

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  • Nelson, Richard R
  • Pack, Howard

Abstract

This article argues that the rapid growth in a number of Asian economies that occurred between 1960 and 1996 was accompanied by a major change in the structure of their economies including shifts in the size of firms and the sectors of specialization. These changes were a fundamental component of the growth process. While capital accumulation was an important source of growth, its productive assimilation was a critical component of the success of these economies. Estimates of the contribution of total factor productivity to aggregate growth that neglect these phenomena may lead to erroneous estimates.

Suggested Citation

  • Nelson, Richard R & Pack, Howard, 1999. "The Asian Miracle and Modern Growth Theory," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(457), pages 416-436, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:109:y:1999:i:457:p:416-36
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 407-443.
    2. Crafts, Nick, 1996. "'Post-neoclassical Endogenous Growth Theory': What Are Its Policy Implications?," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(2), pages 30-47, Summer.
    3. Abramovitz,Moses, 1989. "Thinking about Growth," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521333962, October.
    4. Abramovitz, Moses, 1986. "Catching Up, Forging Ahead, and Falling Behind," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 46(2), pages 385-406, June.
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