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'Post-neoclassical Endogenous Growth Theory': What Are Its Policy Implications?


  • Crafts, Nick


Ideas from new growth economics are considered in the context of British economic policy. A distinction is drawn between "broad capital" and "endogenous innovation" growth models and the latter are seen as more helpful. Solow's insight that in the long run growth is independent of routine investment is regarded as still valid but the neoclassical assumption of convergence in technology is not. A key goal of policy should be to target the rate of total factor productivity growth and thus to address market failures inhibiting technology transfer. Policy initiatives should include institutional reforms as well as the appropriate design of taxes and subsidies. Copyright 1996 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Crafts, Nick, 1996. "'Post-neoclassical Endogenous Growth Theory': What Are Its Policy Implications?," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(2), pages 30-47, Summer.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:12:y:1996:i:2:p:30-47

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Bernanke, Ben S. & Gertler, Mark & Gilchrist, Simon, 1999. "The financial accelerator in a quantitative business cycle framework," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 21, pages 1341-1393 Elsevier.
    2. Bernanke, Ben S. & Gertler, Mark & Gilchrist, Simon, 1999. "The financial accelerator in a quantitative business cycle framework," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 21, pages 1341-1393 Elsevier.
    3. Gerlach, Stefan & Peng, Wensheng, 2005. "Bank lending and property prices in Hong Kong," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 461-481, February.
    4. Gouteron, S. & Szpiro, D., 2005. "Excès de liquidité monétaire et prix des actifs," Working papers 131, Banque de France.
    5. Goncalves, Silvia & Kilian, Lutz, 2004. "Bootstrapping autoregressions with conditional heteroskedasticity of unknown form," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 123(1), pages 89-120, November.
    6. Carmen M. Reinhart & Graciela L. Kaminsky, 1999. "The Twin Crises: The Causes of Banking and Balance-of-Payments Problems," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 473-500, June.
    7. Nelson, Edward, 2003. "The future of monetary aggregates in monetary policy analysis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(5), pages 1029-1059, July.
    8. Tullio Jappelli & Marco Pagano, 1994. "Saving, Growth, and Liquidity Constraints," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(1), pages 83-109.
    9. Nickell, Stephen J, 1981. "Biases in Dynamic Models with Fixed Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(6), pages 1417-1426, November.
    10. David Miles & Vladimir Pillonca, 2008. "Financial innovation and European housing and mortgage markets," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(1), pages 145-175, spring.
    11. Judson, Ruth A. & Owen, Ann L., 1999. "Estimating dynamic panel data models: a guide for macroeconomists," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 9-15, October.
    12. Claudio E. V. Borio & Philip Lowe, 2004. "Securing sustainable price stability: should credit come back from the wilderness?," BIS Working Papers 157, Bank for International Settlements.
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    Cited by:

    1. Torben Holvad & John Preston, 2005. "Road Transport Investment Projects and Additional Economic Benefits," ERSA conference papers ersa05p522, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Nelson, Richard R & Pack, Howard, 1999. "The Asian Miracle and Modern Growth Theory," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(457), pages 416-436, July.
    3. Yingqi Wei & Xiaming Liu & Haiyan Song & Peter Romilly, 2001. "Endogenous innovation growth theory and regional income convergence in China," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(2), pages 153-168.
    4. Kulshreshtha, Mudit & Parikh, Jyoti K., 2001. "A study of productivity in the Indian coal sector," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(9), pages 701-713, July.
    5. Dutz, Mark & Hayri, Aydin, 1999. "Does More Intense Competition Lead to Higher Growth?," CEPR Discussion Papers 2249, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Francesco Guala & Andrea Salanti, 2002. "Model-robustness in ‘old’ and ‘new’ growth theory," Working Papers (-2012) 0201, University of Bergamo, Department of Economics.
    7. Mendieta Muñoz, Rodrigo & Pontarollo, Nicola, 2015. "Cantonal Convergence in Ecuador: A Spatial Econometric Perspective," MPRA Paper 68399, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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