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The structure and composition of international trade in Asia:: historical trends and future prospects

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  • Dowling, Malcolm
  • Ray, David

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  • Dowling, Malcolm & Ray, David, 2000. "The structure and composition of international trade in Asia:: historical trends and future prospects," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 301-318, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:asieco:v:11:y:2000:i:3:p:301-318
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hanna, N. & Guy, K. & Arnold, E., 1995. "The Diffusion of Information Technology. Experience of Industrial Countries and Lessons for Developing Countries," World Bank - Discussion Papers 281, World Bank.
    2. Abramovitz, Moses, 1986. "Catching Up, Forging Ahead, and Falling Behind," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 46(2), pages 385-406, June.
    3. Michael Hobday, 1995. "Innovation In East Asia," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 226.
    4. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew Warner, 1995. "Economic Reform and the Process of Global Integration," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 26(1, 25th A), pages 1-118.
    5. Sanjaya Lall, 1996. "Understanding Technology Development," Palgrave Macmillan Books, in: Learning from the Asian Tigers, chapter 2, pages 27-58, Palgrave Macmillan.
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    Cited by:

    1. Johnson, Andreas, 2006. "FDI and Exports: the case of the High Performing East Asian Economies," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 57, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.

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