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Can Equality in Education Be A New Anti-Corruption Tool?: Cross-Country Evidence (1990-2005)

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  • Patrawart, Kraiyos

Abstract

Recently, expectations have been raised on the civic participation role that requires supports from free press, decent average years in education attainment and independent juridical system in controlling corruption. Even so, questions have been put forward on how far this promising approach can go. This paper asks if these determinants are sufficient for fighting corruption through civic engagement. We propose that education in particular its distribution is the crucial tool for the majority of citizens to correctly acquire the key information and skills to succeed in their anti-corruption initiatives. This paper presents the simple reduced-form theoretical model which allows education inequality among agents before it employs the cross-national panel data estimations between 1990-2005 to evaluate the anti-corruption effect of education equality across the globe. Education equality significantly shows independent and complimentary anti-corruption effects through press freedom and the length of democracy. However, the anti-corruption effect of average years in education lost its robustness when education equality measures are included in fixed effects estimation.

Suggested Citation

  • Patrawart, Kraiyos, 2008. "Can Equality in Education Be A New Anti-Corruption Tool?: Cross-Country Evidence (1990-2005)," MPRA Paper 9665, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:9665
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/9665/1/MPRA_paper_9665.pdf
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Political Economy; Corruption; Distribution of Education; Factor Analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior

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