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Tolerance of Cheating: An Analysis Across Countries

Author

Listed:
  • Jan R. Magnus
  • Victor M. Polterovich
  • Dmitri L. Danilov
  • Alexei V. Savvateev

Abstract

Cheating is a serious problem in many countries. The cheater gets higher marks than deserved, thus reducing the efficiency of a country's educational system. In this study, the authors did not ask if and how often the student had cheated, but rather what the student's opinion was about a cheating situation. They investigated whether attitudes differ among students in Russia, the Netherlands, Israel, and the United States and conclude that attitudes toward cheating differ considerably between these countries. They offer various explanations of this phenomenon. In addition, they find that the student's attitude toward cheating depends on the student's educational level (high school, undergraduate, postgraduate). Finally, they show that the data from the sample can be aggregated in a natural and elegant way, and they suggest a tolerance-of-cheating index for each country.

Suggested Citation

  • Jan R. Magnus & Victor M. Polterovich & Dmitri L. Danilov & Alexei V. Savvateev, 2002. "Tolerance of Cheating: An Analysis Across Countries," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(2), pages 125-135, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jeduce:v:33:y:2002:i:2:p:125-135
    DOI: 10.1080/00220480209596462
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Patrawart, Kraiyos, 2008. "Can Equality in Education Be A New Anti-Corruption Tool?: Cross-Country Evidence (1990-2005)," MPRA Paper 9665, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Cam Caldwell, 2010. "A Ten-Step Model for Academic Integrity: A Positive Approach for Business Schools," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 92(1), pages 1-13, March.
    3. repec:eee:rujoec:v:3:y:2017:i:1:p:24-41 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Maria de Fátima Rocha & Aurora A.C. Teixeira, 2005. "Crime without punishment: An update review of the determinants of cheating among university students," FEP Working Papers 191, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    5. repec:nea:journl:y:2017:i:35:p:185-192 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Serguei MIKHAILITCHENKO, 2017. "Economic structure of educational process and its implications for the higher education reform," Theoretical and Applied Economics, Asociatia Generala a Economistilor din Romania - AGER, vol. 0(1(610), S), pages 69-82, Spring.
    7. repec:aea:aejpol:v:10:y:2018:i:1:p:298-325 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Pascual-Ezama, David & Fosgaard, Toke R. & Cardenas, Juan Camilo & Kujal, Praveen & Veszteg, Robert & Gil-Gómez de Liaño, Beatriz & Gunia, Brian & Weichselbaumer, Doris & Hilken, Katharina & Antinyan,, 2015. "Context-dependent cheating: Experimental evidence from 16 countries," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 379-386.
    9. César Martinelli & Susan W. Parker & Ana Cristina Pérez-Gea & Rodimiro Rodrigo, 2018. "Cheating and Incentives: Learning from a Policy Experiment," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 10(1), pages 298-325, February.
    10. Paul W. Grimes & Jon P. Rezek, 2005. "The Determinants of Cheating by High School Economics Students: A Comparative Study of Academic Dishonesty in the Transitional Economies," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 4(2), pages 23-45.
    11. Borisova, Ekaterina & Peresetsky, Anatoly, 2016. "Do secrets come out? Statistical evaluation of student cheating," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 44, pages 119-130.
    12. Michał Krawczyk, 2012. "Sex, morals and exam cheating," Working Papers 2012-09, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    13. Polterovich, Victor, 2017. "Positive collaboration: Factors and mechanisms of evolution," Russian Journal of Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(1), pages 24-41.
    14. Maria de Fátima Rocha & Aurora A.C. Teixeira, 2005. "College cheating in Portugal: results from a large scale survey," FEP Working Papers 197, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    15. Maria Fátima Rocha & Aurora A.C. Teixeira, 2006. "A cross-country evaluation of cheating in academia: is it related to ‘real world’ business ethics?," FEP Working Papers 214, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    16. Borisova, E. & Polishchuk, L. & Suvorov, A., 2014. "Observe or Violate: Intrinsic Motivation of Academic Ethics," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, vol. 22(2), pages 41-72.
    17. Serguei MIKHAILITCHENKO, 2017. "Economic structure of educational process and its implications for the higher education reform," Theoretical and Applied Economics, Asociatia Generala a Economistilor din Romania - AGER, vol. 0(1(610), S), pages 69-82, Spring.
    18. Alessandro Bucciol & Simona Cicognani & Natalia Montinari, 2017. "Cheating in Academia: The Relevance of Social Factors," Working Papers 15/2017, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
    19. Osipian, Ararat, 2008. "Corruption of the Politicized University: Lessons from the Orange Revolution in Ukraine," MPRA Paper 11312, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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