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Do stress tests matter? Evidence from the 2014 and 2016 stress tests

Author

Listed:
  • Georgescu, Oana-Maria
  • Gross, Marco
  • Kapp, Daniel
  • Kok, Christoffer

Abstract

Stress tests have been increasingly used in recent years by regulators to foster confidence in the banking sector by not only increasing its resilience via mandatory capital increases but also by enhancing transparency to allow investors to better discriminate between banks. In this study, using an event study approach, we explore how market participants reacted to the 2014 Comprehensive Assessment and the 2016 EBA EU-wide stress test. The results show that stress test disclosures revealed new information that was priced by the markets. We also provide evidence that the publication of stress test results enhanced price discrimination as the impact on bank CDS spreads and equity prices tended to be stronger for the weaker performing banks in the stress test. Finally, we provide some evidence that also sovereign funding costs were affected in the aftermath of the stress test publications. The results provide insights into the effects and usefulness of stress test-related disclosures. JEL Classification: G14, G18, G21

Suggested Citation

  • Georgescu, Oana-Maria & Gross, Marco & Kapp, Daniel & Kok, Christoffer, 2017. "Do stress tests matter? Evidence from the 2014 and 2016 stress tests," Working Paper Series 2054, European Central Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecb:ecbwps:20172054
    Note: 3098116
    as

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    File URL: https://www.ecb.europa.eu//pub/pdf/scpwps/ecb.wp2054.en.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Roman Horvath & Dan Vaško, 2012. "Central Bank Transparency and Financial Stability: Measurement, Determinants and Effects," Working Papers IES 2012/25, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Sep 2012.
    2. Gick, Wolfgang & Pausch, Thilo, 2012. "Persuasion by stress testing: Optimal disclosure of supervisory information in the banking sector," Discussion Papers 32/2012, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    3. Viral Acharya & Itamar Drechsler & Philipp Schnabl, 2014. "A Pyrrhic Victory? Bank Bailouts and Sovereign Credit Risk," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 69(6), pages 2689-2739, December.
    4. Salleo, Carmelo & Homar, Timotej & Kick, Heinrich, 2016. "Making sense of the EU wide stress test: a comparison with the SRISK approach," Working Paper Series 1920, European Central Bank.
    5. Bosma, Jakob & Koetter, Michael & Wedow, Michael, 2012. "Credit risk connectivity in the financial industry and stabilization effects of government bailouts," Discussion Papers 16/2012, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lukas Ahnert & Pascal Vogt & Volker Vonhoff & Florian Weigert, 2018. "The Impact of Regulatory Stress Testing on Bank's Equity and CDS Performance," Working Papers on Finance 1814, University of St. Gallen, School of Finance.
    2. Nuno Cassola & Christoffer Kok & Francesco Paolo Mongelli, 2019. "The ECB after the crisis: existing synergies among monetary policy, macroprudential policies and banking supervision," Working Papers 424, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Dec 2019.
    3. Brunella Bruno & Immacolata Marino, 2018. "How Do Banks Respond to Non-Performing Loans?," CSEF Working Papers 513, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy, revised 02 May 2020.
    4. Ahnert, Lukas & Vogt, Pascal & Vonhoff, Volker & Weigert, Florian, 2020. "Regulatory stress testing and bank performance," CFR Working Papers 20-03, University of Cologne, Centre for Financial Research (CFR).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    bank stress tests; disclosure; event study;

    JEL classification:

    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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