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Higher Education in India - The Need for Change

Author

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  • Pawan Agarwal

    (Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations)

Abstract

Higher education in India suffers from several systemic deficiencies. As a result, it continues to provide graduates that are unemployable despite emerging shortages of skilled manpower in an increasing number of sectors. The standards of academic research are low and declining. Some of the problems of the Indian higher education, such as the unwieldy affiliating system, inflexible academic structure, uneven capacity across various subjects, eroding autonomy of academic institutions, and the low level of public funding are well known. Many other concerns relating to the dysfunctional regulatory environment, the accreditation system that has low coverage and no consequences, absence of incentives for performing well, and the unjust public funding policies are not well recognised. Driven by populism and in the absence of good data, there is little informed public debate on higher education in India.

Suggested Citation

  • Pawan Agarwal, 2006. "Higher Education in India - The Need for Change," Development Economics Working Papers 22139, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:eab:develo:22139
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    File URL: http://www.eaber.org/node/22139
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Devesh Kapur & Pratap Bhanu Mehta, 2004. "Indian Higher Education Reform: From Half-Baked Socialism to Half-Baked Capitalism," CID Working Papers 108, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    2. Henrekson, Magnus & Rosenberg, Nathan, 2001. "Designing Efficient Institutions for Science-Based Entrepreneurship: Lessons from the US and Sweden," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 26(3), pages 207-231, June.
    3. Richard B. Freeman, 2006. "Does Globalization of the Scientific/Engineering Workforce Threaten U.S. Economic Leadership?," NBER Chapters,in: Innovation Policy and the Economy, Volume 6, pages 123-158 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Christopher N. Avery & Mark E. Glickman & Caroline M. Hoxby & Andrew Metrick, 2013. "A Revealed Preference Ranking of U.S. Colleges and Universities," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(1), pages 425-467.
    5. Gautier, P.A. & Teulings, C.N., 2009. "Search and the city," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 251-265, May.
    6. Michael Spence, 1973. "Job Market Signaling," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 87(3), pages 355-374.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. K.K. George & K.K. Krishnakumar, 2018. "Kerala’s Development Experience: Its Implications for Finance Commissions," Working Papers id:12557, eSocialSciences.
    2. repec:wsi:serxxx:v:53:y:2008:i:03:n:s021759080800304x is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:lan:wpaper:4484 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:lan:wpaper:4789 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Nelson Oviedo & Gustavo Yamada, 2017. "Educación superior y subempleo profesional, ¿Una creciente burbuja mundial?," Working Papers 1609, Departamento de Economía, Universidad del Pacífico, revised Feb 2017.
    6. repec:lan:wpaper:4356 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. A Aggarwal & R Freguglia & G Johnes & G Spricigo, 2011. "Education and labour market outcomes : evidence from India," Working Papers 615663, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    8. repec:lan:wpaper:4355 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    reforms in education; Quality assurance in education; funding of higher education; Regulating Higher Education;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations

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