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Education and labour market outcomes : evidence from India

  • A Aggarwal
  • R Freguglia
  • G Johnes
  • G Spricigo

The impact of education on labour market outcomes is analysed using data from various rounds of the National Sample Survey of India. Occupational destination is examined using both multinomial logit analyses and structural dynamic discrete choice modelling. The latter approach involves the use of a novel approach to constructing a pseudo-panel from repeated cross-section data, and is particularly useful as a means of evaluating policy impacts over time. We find that policy to expand educational provision leads initially to an increased takeup of education, and in the longer term leads to an increased propensity for workers to enter non-manual employment.

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Paper provided by Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department in its series Working Papers with number 615663.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:lan:wpaper:615663
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