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How does education affect labour market outcomes?

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  • Alina Mariuca Ionescu

    () (Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi)

Abstract

The paper aims to identify and characterize certain relationships that might appear between the access to education and the labour market outcomes. It emphasizes several aspects of education influencing labour market outcomes pointing out which are the main outcomes impacted by education. The analysis is focused on 32 European countries, while data on United States and Japan are also considered. Within this study, the access to education is defined in terms of participation and investments (expenditure on education and research, financial aid to students, funding of education). Labour market outcomes are assessed mainly using different employment/ unemployment rates as well as elements of wages and earnings. The findings show that the higher one's level of education, the better one's chances of getting a job and keeping the status of employed person in times of crisis on labour market. A higher participation in education is not necessarily associated with a higher employment rate, since the entry on the labour market occurs for some individuals as an alternative to continuing their education.

Suggested Citation

  • Alina Mariuca Ionescu, 2012. "How does education affect labour market outcomes?," Review of Applied Socio-Economic Research, Pro Global Science Association, vol. 4(2), pages 130-144, Decembre.
  • Handle: RePEc:rse:wpaper:v:4:y:2012:i:2:p:130-144
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    File URL: http://reaser.eu/RePec/rse/wpaper/17_Ionescu_Reaser4_130-144.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Margolis & Véronique Simonnet, 2002. "Educational Track, Networks and Labor Market Outcomes," Working Papers 2002-60, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
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    3. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Introduction to "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings"," NBER Chapters,in: Schooling, Experience, and Earnings, pages 1-4 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. A Aggarwal & R Freguglia & G Johnes & G Spricigo, 2011. "Education and labour market outcomes : evidence from India," Working Papers 615663, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    5. Cristina Iannelli, 2002. "Parental Education and Young People's Educational and Labour Market Outcomes: A Comparison across Europe," MZES Working Papers 45, MZES.
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    7. Tazeen Fasih, 2008. "Linking Education Policy to Labor Market Outcomes," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6407.
    8. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number minc74-1, December.
    9. Simonnet, V. & Ulrich, V., 1999. "La formation professionnelle et l'insertion sur le marche du travail : une analyse multicriteres," Papiers d'Economie Mathématique et Applications 1999.99, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1).
    10. Mathias Kuepie & Christophe Nordman & François Roubaud, 2006. "Education and Labour Market Outcomes in Sub-Saharan West Africa," Working Papers DT/2006/16, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
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    13. Eric Maurin & Theodora Xenogiani, 2007. "Demand for Education and Labor Market Outcomes: Lessons from the Abolition of Compulsory Conscription in France," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(4).
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    1. repec:cmj:seapas:y:2017:i:15:p:363-371 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    education; labour market; labour market outcomes.;

    JEL classification:

    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General

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