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Early Career Experiences and Later Career Outcomes

Author

Listed:
  • David Margolis

    (CREST - Centre de Recherche en Économie et Statistique - ENSAI - Ecole Nationale de la Statistique et de l'Analyse de l'Information [Bruz] - X - École polytechnique - ENSAE Paris - École Nationale de la Statistique et de l'Administration Économique - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, IZA - Institute for the Study of Labor, TEAM - Théories et Applications en Microéconomie et Macroéconomie - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Véronique Simonnet

    (TEAM - Théories et Applications en Microéconomie et Macroéconomie - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Lars Vilhuber

    (US Census Bureau - University of York [York, UK])

Abstract

This paper represents an attempt to untangle the theoretically complicated, and empirically uncertain, links between the early career experiences of young people in the labor market and their labor market success or failure later in life. We use a large set of measures of early career experiences and consider the impact of these measures on a variety of different measures of later career success 5 to 20 years after labor market insertion. Institutions seem to condition labor market outcomes, as our results differ significantly from one country to the next, for the same variables in the same econometric specifications. We find that labor market outcomes in (western) Germany are consistent with a dual labor market model for men and unobserved heterogeneity in reservation wages for women. In the case of American workers, either the market learns about unobservable worker characteristics over time, or the implicit contracts established at the start of the career are increasingly renegotiated over time. Unobserved heterogeneity in individuals' networks of labor market contacts is an explanation that seems to be the most consistent with our results for France. These results reflect optimal firm responses to the different institutional environments in each country in the presence of imperfect information concerning young workers ex ante.

Suggested Citation

  • David Margolis & Véronique Simonnet & Lars Vilhuber, 1999. "Early Career Experiences and Later Career Outcomes," Post-Print halshs-00367567, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00367567
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00367567
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    Cited by:

    1. Stefan Bender & Till von Wachter, 2006. "In the Right Place at the Wrong Time: The Role of Firms and Luck in Young Workers' Careers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(5), pages 1679-1705, December.
    2. Michèle Mansuy & Olivier Marchand, 2004. "De l’école à l’emploi : des parcours de plus en plus complexes," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 378(1), pages 3-13.
    3. Alina Mariuca Ionescu, 2012. "How does education affect labour market outcomes?," Review of Applied Socio-Economic Research, Pro Global Science Association, vol. 4(2), pages 130-144, Decembre.

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