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The Trend over Time of the Gender Wage Gap in Italy

  • Chiara MUSSIDA

    ()

    (Department of Economics and Social Sciences, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Piacenza, Italy)

  • Matteo PICCHIO

    ()

    (Department of Economics, CentER, ReflecT, Tilburg University, The Netherlands and IZA, Germany)

We analyse gender wage inequalities in Italy in the mid-1990s and in the mid-2000s. In this period important labour market developments occurred: institutional changes have loosened the use of flexible and atypical contracts; the female employment rates and educational levels have substantially increased. We identify the time trends of different components of the gender wage gap by estimating wage distributions in the presence of covariates and sample selection and by counterfactual microsimulations. We find that women swam against the tide: whilst the trend in female qualifications slightly reduced the gender wage gap, the gender relative trends in the wage structure significantly increased it.

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Paper provided by Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES) in its series Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) with number 2011031.

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Length: 33
Date of creation: 17 Aug 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ctl:louvir:2011031
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  1. Picchio, Matteo & Mussida, Chiara, 2011. "Gender wage gap: A semi-parametric approach with sample selection correction," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 564-578, October.
  2. Bart COCKX & Matteo PICCHIO, 2009. "Are Short-Lived Jobs Stepping Stones to Long-Lasting Jobs ?," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2009004, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
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  6. José Mata & José A. F. Machado, 2005. "Counterfactual decomposition of changes in wage distributions using quantile regression," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(4), pages 445-465.
  7. Donald, Stephen G & Green, David A & Paarsch, Harry J, 2000. "Differences in Wage Distributions between Canada and the United States: An Application of a Flexible Estimator of Distribution Functions in the Presence of Covariates," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(4), pages 609-33, October.
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  10. Jim Albrecht & Aico van Vuuren & Susan Vroman, 2007. "Counterfactual Distributions with Sample Selection Adjustments: Econometric Theory and an Application to the Netherlands," Working Papers gueconwpa~07-07-06, Georgetown University, Department of Economics.
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  14. Arnaud Chevalier, 2006. "Education, Occupation and Career Expectations: Determinants of the Gender Pay Gap for UK Graduates," CEE Discussion Papers 0069, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  15. Claudia Goldin & Cecilia Rouse, 1997. "Orchestrating Impartiality: The Impact of 'Blind' Auditions on Female Musicians," Working Papers 755, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  16. Olivetti, Claudia & Petrongolo, Barbara, 2006. "Unequal Pay or Unequal Employment? A Cross-Country Analysis of Gender Gaps," IZA Discussion Papers 1941, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  17. Martin Schindler, 2009. "The Italian Labor Market; Recent Trends, Institutions, and Reform Options," IMF Working Papers 09/47, International Monetary Fund.
  18. Dario Sciulli, 2006. "Making the Italian Labor Market More Flexible: An Evaluation of the Treu Reform," Economics Working Papers we063408, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Economía.
  19. Gianna Barbieri & Paolo Sestito, 2008. "Temporary Workers in Italy: Who Are They and Where They End Up," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 22(1), pages 127-166, 03.
  20. Tindara Addabbo & Donata Favaro & Stefano Magrini, 2007. "The Distribution of the Gender Wage Gap in Italy: Does Education Matter?," Center for Economic Research (RECent) 004, University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics "Marco Biagi".
  21. Gerard J. van den Berg & Maarten Lindeboom, 1998. "Attrition in Panel Survey Data and the Estimation of Multi-State Labor Market Models," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(2), pages 458-478.
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