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A Macroeconomic Model of Endogenous Systemic Risk Taking

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  • Martinez-Miera, David
  • Suarez, Javier

Abstract

We analyze banks' systemic risk taking in a simple dynamic general equilibrium model. Banks collect funds from savers and make loans to firms. Banks are owned by risk-neutral bankers who provide the equity needed to comply with capital requirements. Bankers decide their (unobservable) exposure to systemic shocks by trading off risk-shifting gains with the value of preserving their capital after a systemic shock. Capital requirements reduce credit and output in

Suggested Citation

  • Martinez-Miera, David & Suarez, Javier, 2012. "A Macroeconomic Model of Endogenous Systemic Risk Taking," CEPR Discussion Papers 9134, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:9134
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    Cited by:

    1. Laurent Clerc & Alexis Derviz & Caterina Mendicino & Stephane Moyen & Kalin Nikolov & Livio Stracca & Javier Suarez & Alexandros P. Vardoulakis, 2015. "Capital Regulation in a Macroeconomic Model with Three Layers of Default," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 11(3), pages 9-63, June.
    2. Jordà, Òscar & Schularick, Moritz & Taylor, Alan M., 2011. "When Credit Bites Back: Leverage, Business Cycles, and Crises," CEPR Discussion Papers 8678, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Natalie Tiernan & Pedro Gete, 2014. "Overlending and Macroprudential Tools," 2014 Meeting Papers 379, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    4. Rafael Repullo & Javier Suarez, 2013. "The Procyclical Effects of Bank Capital Regulation," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 26(2), pages 452-490.
    5. Fabrice Collard & Harris Dellas & Behzad Diba & Olivier Loisel, 2017. "Optimal Monetary and Prudential Policies," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(1), pages 40-87, January.
    6. Gersbach, Hans & Rochet, Jean-Charles & Scheffel, Martin, 2018. "Financial Intermediation, Capital Accumulation and Crisis Recovery," TSE Working Papers 18-885, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
    7. Marc Busse & Michel Dacorogna & Marie Kratz, 2014. "The Impact of Systemic Risk on the Diversification Benefits of a Risk Portfolio," Risks, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 2(3), pages 1-17, July.
    8. Goodhart, Charles, 2013. "Ratio controls need reconsideration," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 445-450.
    9. Josef Schroth & Stephane Moyen, 2017. "Optimal Capital Regulation," 2017 Meeting Papers 828, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    10. Koetter, Michael, 2013. "Market structure and competition in German banking: Modules I and IV," Working Papers 06/2013, German Council of Economic Experts / Sachverständigenrat zur Begutachtung der gesamtwirtschaftlichen Entwicklung.
    11. Gete, Pedro & Tiernan, Natalie, 2014. "Lending Standards and Countercyclical Capital Requirements under Imperfect Information," MPRA Paper 54486, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Gersbach, Hans & Rochet, Jean-Charles & Scheffel, Martin, 2015. "Financial Intermediation, Capital Accumulation, and Recovery," CEPR Discussion Papers 10964, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    13. Hartmann, Philipp & Hubrich, Kirstin & Kremer, Manfred & Tetlow, Robert J., 2013. "Melting down: Systemic financial instability and the macroeconomy," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 80487, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    14. Gersbach, Hans & Rochet, Jean-Charles & Scheffel, Martin, 2018. "Financial Intermediation, Capital Accumulation and Crisis Recovery," IDEI Working Papers 881, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse.
    15. Roberto Robatto, 2015. "Financial Crises and Systemic Bank Runs in a Dynamic Model of Banking," 2015 Meeting Papers 483, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    16. Federico Lubello & Ivan Petrella & Emiliano Santoro, 2018. "Chained financial frictions and credit cycles," BCL working papers 116, Central Bank of Luxembourg.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Capital requirements; Credit cycles; Financial crises; Macroprudential policies; Risk shifting; Systemic risk;

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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