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Government Spending Multipliers and the Zero Lower Bound in an Open Economy

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  • Charles Olivier Mao Takongmo

Abstract

What is the size of the government-spending multiplier in an open economy when the Zero Lower Bound (ZLB) on the nominal interest rate is binding? Using a theoretical framework, in a closed economy, Christiano, Eichenbaum, and Rebelo (2011), show that, when the nominal interest rate is binding, the government-spending multiplier can be close to four. Their theory helps us to understand the government spending multiplier in ZLB, but it is difficult to match that theory with the data. We propose a dynamic stochastic general equilibrium in open macroeconomics, with market imperfections, wage and price rigidities and endogenous smoothing monetary policy. We argue that, in a closed economy and in the presence of ZLB, there is no crowding out effect through interest rates. We also argue that in an open economy, there is another channel for the crowding out effect via the real exchange rate. For an open economy, the multiplier falls to the levels usually observed in small, closed economies for which the ZLB is not binding.

Suggested Citation

  • Charles Olivier Mao Takongmo, 2014. "Government Spending Multipliers and the Zero Lower Bound in an Open Economy," CIRANO Working Papers 2014s-43, CIRANO.
  • Handle: RePEc:cir:cirwor:2014s-43
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    Cited by:

    1. MAO TAKONGMO, Charles Olivier, 2019. "Keynesian Models, Detrending, and the Method of Moments," MPRA Paper 91709, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. MAO TAKONGMO, Charles Olivier, 2019. "Revisiting the AA-DD model in Zero Lower Bound," MPRA Paper 91829, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. LEBIHAN, Laetitia & MAO TAKONGMO, Charles Olivier & McKELLIPS, Fanny, 2017. "Health Inequalities for Immigrants in Canada : Quebec versus the Rest of Canada," MPRA Paper 79970, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Jun 2017.
    4. Charles Olivier Mao Takongmo & Laetitia Lebihan, 2021. "Government Spending, GDP and Exchange Rate in Zero Lower Bound: Measuring Causality at Multiple Horizons," Journal of Quantitative Economics, Springer;The Indian Econometric Society (TIES), vol. 19(1), pages 139-160, March.
    5. Lebihan Laetitia & Olivier Mao Takongmo Charles & McKellips Fanny, 2018. "Health Disparities for Immigrants: Theory and Evidence from Canada," Review of Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 69(3), pages 183-206, December.
    6. Charles Olivier Mao Takongmo, 2021. "DSGE models, detrending, and the method of moments," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 73(1), pages 67-99, January.
    7. DIARRA, Setou & LEBIHAN, Laetitia & MAO TAKONGMO, Charles Olivier, 2018. "Polygyny, Child Education, Health and Labour: Theory and Evidence from Mali," MPRA Paper 88518, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Government-spending multiplier; zero lower bound; sticky price; sticky wages; Taylor rule;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • F44 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Business Cycles

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