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Optimized Monetary Policy Rules in Multi-Sector Small Open Economies: The Role of Real Rigidities

  • Maral Kichian
  • Ali Dib
  • Carlos de Resende

Inflation-targeting central banks around the world often state their inflation objectives with regard to the consumer price index (CPI). Yet the literature on optimal monetary policy based on models with nominal rigidities and more than one sector suggests that CPI inflation is not always the best choice from a social welfare perspective. We revisit this issue in the context of an estimated multi-sector New-Keynesian small open economy model where sectors are heterogeneous along multiple dimensions. With key parameters of the model estimated using data from an inflation targeting economy, namely Canada, we particularly focus on (i) the role of sector-specific real rigidities, specially in the form of factor mobility costs, and (ii) welfare implications of targeting alternative price indices. Our estimations reveal considerable heterogeneity across sectors, and in several dimensions. Moreover, in contrast to existing studies, our welfare analysis comparing simple policy rules based on alternative inflation rates provides support for CPI-based targeting policies by central banks. Capital mobility costs matter importantly in this regard.

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Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2010 Meeting Papers with number 184.

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Date of creation: 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:red:sed010:184
Contact details of provider: Postal: Society for Economic Dynamics Marina Azzimonti Department of Economics Stonybrook University 10 Nicolls Road Stonybrook NY 11790 USA
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  1. Obstfeld, Maurice & Rogoff, Kenneth, 1999. "New Directions for Stochastic Open Economy Models," Center for International and Development Economics Research, Working Paper Series qt5pf7g8sh, Center for International and Development Economics Research, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkeley.
  2. Michael B. Devereux & Charles Engel, 2003. "Monetary Policy in the Open Economy Revisited: Price Setting and Exchange-Rate Flexibility," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 70(4), pages 765-783, October.
  3. Eva Ortega & Nooman Rebei, 2006. "The Welfare Implications of Inflation versus Price-Level Targeting in a Two-Sector, Small Open Economy," Working Papers 06-12, Bank of Canada.
  4. Bianca De Paoli, 2004. "Monetary policy and welfare in a small open economy," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19950, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
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  6. BOUAKEZ, Hafed & CARDIA Emanuela & RUGE-MURCIA, Francisco, 2005. "The Transmission of Monetary Policy in a Multi-Sector Economy," Cahiers de recherche 2005-16, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
  7. Jeannine Bailliu & Ali Dib & Takashi Kano & Lawrence Schembri, 2007. "Multilateral Adjustment and Exchange Rate Dynamics: The Case of Three Commodity Currencies," Working Papers 07-41, Bank of Canada.
  8. Kollmann, Robert, 2004. "Macroeconomic Effects of Nominal Exchange Rate Regimes: New Insights into the Role of Price Dynamics," CEPR Discussion Papers 4487, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Obstfeld, Maurice & Rogoff, Kenneth S., 1995. "Exchange Rate Dynamics Redux," Scholarly Articles 12491026, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  10. Alejandro Justiniano & Bruce Preston, 2006. "Can Structural Small Open Economy Models Account for the Influence of Foreign Disturbances?," 2006 Meeting Papers 479, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  11. Ireland, Peter N., 2003. "Endogenous money or sticky prices?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(8), pages 1623-1648, November.
  12. Betts, Caroline & Devereux, Michael B., 1996. "The exchange rate in a model of pricing-to-market," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(3-5), pages 1007-1021, April.
  13. Dib, Ali, 2006. "Nominal rigidities and monetary policy in Canada," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 303-325, June.
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