IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ces/ceswps/_7815.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Countercyclical Capital Buffer and the Composition of Bank Lending

Author

Listed:
  • Raphael A. Auer
  • Steven Ongena

Abstract

Do macroprudential regulations on residential lending influence commercial lending behavior too? To answer this question, we identify the compositional changes in banks’ supply of credit using the variation in their holdings of residential mortgages on which extra capital requirements were uniformly imposed by the countercyclical capital buffer (CCyB) introduced in Switzerland in 2012. We find that the CCyB’s introduction led to higher growth in commercial lending although this was unrelated to conditions in regional housing markets. Interest rates and fees charged to the firms concurrently increased. We rationalize these findings in a model featuring both private and firm-specific collateral.

Suggested Citation

  • Raphael A. Auer & Steven Ongena, 2019. "The Countercyclical Capital Buffer and the Composition of Bank Lending," CESifo Working Paper Series 7815, CESifo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_7815
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.cesifo.org/DocDL/cesifo1_wp7815.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ongena, Steven & Popov, Alexander & Udell, Gregory F., 2013. "“When the cat's away the mice will play”: Does regulation at home affect bank risk-taking abroad?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(3), pages 727-750.
    2. Reint Gropp & Thomas Mosk & Steven Ongena & Carlo Wix, 2019. "Banks Response to Higher Capital Requirements: Evidence from a Quasi-Natural Experiment," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 32(1), pages 266-299.
    3. Gabriel Jiménez & Steven Ongena & José‐Luis Peydró & Jesús Saurina, 2014. "Hazardous Times for Monetary Policy: What Do Twenty‐Three Million Bank Loans Say About the Effects of Monetary Policy on Credit Risk‐Taking?," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 82(2), pages 463-505, March.
    4. Simone Auer & Maja Ganarin & Pascal Towbin, 2017. "International Banking and Cross-Border Effects of Regulation: Lessons from Switzerland," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 13(2), pages 65-93, March.
    5. Rustom M. Irani & Rajkamal Iyer & Ralf R. Meisenzahl & José-Luis Peydró, 2018. "The rise of shadow banking: evidence from capital regulation," Economics Working Papers 1652, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Jul 2020.
    6. Ongena, Steven & Smith, David C., 2000. "What Determines the Number of Bank Relationships? Cross-Country Evidence," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 26-56, January.
    7. Deniz O Igan & Heedon Kang, 2011. "Do Loan-To-Value and Debt-To-Income Limits Work? Evidence From Korea," IMF Working Papers 11/297, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Gabriel Jiménez & Steven Ongena & José-Luis Peydró & Jesús Saurina, 2017. "Macroprudential Policy, Countercyclical Bank Capital Buffers, and Credit Supply: Evidence from the Spanish Dynamic Provisioning Experiments," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 125(6), pages 2126-2177.
    9. Gambacorta, Leonardo & Mistrulli, Paolo Emilio, 2004. "Does bank capital affect lending behavior?," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 436-457, October.
    10. Christoph Basten & Catherine Koch, 2015. "Higher bank capital requirements and mortgage pricing: evidence from the Countercyclical Capital Buffer (CCB)," BIS Working Papers 511, Bank for International Settlements.
    11. Gabriele Galati & Richhild Moessner, 2013. "Macroprudential Policy – A Literature Review," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 27(5), pages 846-878, December.
    12. Altavilla, Carlo & Boucinha, Miguel & Holton, Sarah & Ongena, Steven, 2018. "Credit supply and demand in unconventional times," Working Paper Series 2202, European Central Bank.
    13. Claudia M Buch & Linda S Goldberg, 2017. "Cross-Border Prudential Policy Spillovers: How Much? How Important? Evidence from the International Banking Research Network," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 13(2), pages 505-558, March.
    14. Degryse, Hans & De Jonghe, Olivier & Jakovljević, Sanja & Mulier, Klaas & Schepens, Glenn, 2019. "Identifying credit supply shocks with bank-firm data: Methods and applications," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 40(C).
    15. Michael Brei & Leonardo Gambacorta, 2016. "Are bank capital ratios pro-cyclical? New evidence and perspectives," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 31(86), pages 357-403.
    16. Olivier De Jonghe & Hans Dewachter & Klaas Mulier & Steven Ongena & Glenn Schepens, 2020. "Some Borrowers Are More Equal than Others: Bank Funding Shocks and Credit Reallocation [A theory of systemic risk and design of prudential bank regulation]," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 24(1), pages 1-43.
    17. Vasso Ioannidou & Steven Ongena & José-Luis Peydró, 2015. "Monetary Policy, Risk-Taking, and Pricing: Evidence from a Quasi-Natural Experiment," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 19(1), pages 95-144.
    18. Aiyar, Shekhar & Calomiris, Charles W. & Wieladek, Tomasz, 2016. "How does credit supply respond to monetary policy and bank minimum capital requirements?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 142-165.
    19. Judit Temesvary, 2018. "The Role Of Regulatory Arbitrage In U.S. Banks' International Flows: Bank‐Level Evidence," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 56(4), pages 2077-2098, October.
    20. Christoffer Koch & Gary Richardson & Patrick Van Horn, 2020. "Countercyclical Capital Buffers: A Cautionary Tale," NBER Working Papers 26710, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    21. Mathias Drehmann & Claudio Borio & Leonardo Gambacorta & Gabriel Jiminez & Carlos Trucharte, 2010. "Countercyclical capital buffers: exploring options," BIS Working Papers 317, Bank for International Settlements.
    22. Christoph Basten, 2020. "Higher Bank Capital Requirements and Mortgage Pricing: Evidence from the Counter-Cyclical Capital Buffer," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 24(2), pages 453-495.
    23. Cerutti, Eugenio & Claessens, Stijn & Laeven, Luc, 2017. "The use and effectiveness of macroprudential policies: New evidence," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 203-224.
    24. Steven Ongena & Ibolya Schindele & Dzsamila Vonnák, 2017. "In Lands of Foreign Currency Credit, Bank Lending Channels Run Through?," MNB Working Papers 2017/6, Magyar Nemzeti Bank (Central Bank of Hungary).
    25. De Jonghe, Olivier & Dewachter, Hans & Ongena, Steven, 2020. "Bank capital (requirements) and credit supply: Evidence from pillar 2 decisions," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 60(C).
    26. Fischer, Andreas M & Zachmann, Lucca, 2020. "The effect of self-financed property buyers on local house prices," CEPR Discussion Papers 14632, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    27. Claudia M. Buch & Matthieu Bussière, & Linda Goldberg, 2017. "International Prudential Policy Spillovers: Evidence from the International Banking Research Network," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 13(2), pages 1-4, March.
    28. Marianne Bertrand & Esther Duflo & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "How Much Should We Trust Differences-In-Differences Estimates?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(1), pages 249-275.
    29. Joel F. Houston & Chen Lin & Yue Ma, 2012. "Regulatory Arbitrage and International Bank Flows," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 67(5), pages 1845-1895, October.
    30. Stefanie Behncke, 2020. "Effects of macroprudential policies on bank lending and credit risks," Working Papers 2020-06, Swiss National Bank.
    31. Asim Ijaz Khwaja & Atif Mian, 2008. "Tracing the Impact of Bank Liquidity Shocks: Evidence from an Emerging Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(4), pages 1413-1442, September.
    32. Gabriel Chodorow-Reich, 2014. "The Employment Effects of Credit Market Disruptions: Firm-level Evidence from the 2008-9 Financial Crisis," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 129(1), pages 1-59.
    33. DellʼAriccia, Giovanni & Laeven, Luc & Marquez, Robert, 2014. "Real interest rates, leverage, and bank risk-taking," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 149(C), pages 65-99.
    34. Jun Qian & Philip E. Strahan, 2007. "How Laws and Institutions Shape Financial Contracts: The Case of Bank Loans," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 62(6), pages 2803-2834, December.
    35. Doris Neuberger & Maurice Pedergnana & Solvig Räthke-Döppner, 2008. "Concentration of Banking Relationships in Switzerland: The Result of Firm Structure or Banking Market Structure?," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 33(2), pages 101-126, April.
    36. Ferrari, Stijn & Pirovano, Mara & Rovira Kaltwasser, Pablo, 2017. "The impact of sectoral macroprudential capital requirements on mortgage lending: evidence from the Belgian risk weight add-on," MPRA Paper 80821, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    37. Ongena, Steven & Schindele, Ibolya & Vonnák, Dzsamila, 2014. "In lands of foreign currency credit, bank lending channels run through? The effects of monetary policy at home and abroad on the currency denomination of the supply of credit," CFS Working Paper Series 474, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
    38. Judit Temesvary, 2015. "The Role of Regulatory Arbitrage in U.S. Banks’ International Lending Flows: Bank-Level Evidence," FIW Working Paper series 151, FIW.
    39. Doris Neuberger & Solvig Räthke & Christoph Schacht, 2006. "The Number of Bank Relationships of SMEs: A Disaggregated Analysis of Changes in the Swiss Loan Market," Economic Notes, Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena SpA, vol. 35(3), pages 319-353, November.
    40. Shekhar Aiyar & Charles W. Calomiris & Tomasz Wieladek, 2014. "Does Macro‐Prudential Regulation Leak? Evidence from a UK Policy Experiment," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 46(s1), pages 181-214, February.
    41. Samuel G. Hanson & Anil K. Kashyap & Jeremy C. Stein, 2011. "A Macroprudential Approach to Financial Regulation," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 25(1), pages 3-28, Winter.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Joshua Aizenman & Menzie D. Chinn & Hiro Ito, 2020. "Financial Spillovers and Macroprudential Policies," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 31(3), pages 529-563, July.
    2. Budnik, Katarzyna, 2020. "The effect of macroprudential policies on credit developments in Europe 1995-2017," Working Paper Series 2462, European Central Bank.
    3. Mircea Epure & Irina Mihai & Camelia Minoiu & José-Luis Peydró, 2017. "Household Credit, Global Financial Cycle, and Macroprudential Policies: Credit Register Evidence from an Emerging Country," Working Papers 1006, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    4. Fabio Berton & Sauro Mocetti & Andrea F. Presbitero & Matteo Richiardi, 2018. "Banks, Firms, and Jobs," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 31(6), pages 2113-2156.
    5. Abuka, Charles & Alinda, Ronnie K. & Minoiu, Camelia & Peydró, José-Luis & Presbitero, Andrea F., 2019. "Monetary Policy and Bank Lending in Developing Countries: Loan Applications, Rates, and Real Effects," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 185-202.
    6. Viral V. Acharya & Katharina Bergant & Matteo Crosignani & Tim Eisert & Fergal J. McCann, 2020. "The Anatomy of the Transmission of Macroprudential Policies," NBER Working Papers 27292, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Stijn Claessens & M Ayhan Kose, 2018. "Frontiers of macrofinancial linkages," BIS Papers, Bank for International Settlements, number 95, 12-2019.
    8. Cappelletti, Giuseppe & Reghezza, Alessio & Rodriguez d’Acri, Costanza & Spaggiari, Martina, 2020. "Compositional effects of O-SII capital buffers and the role of monetary policy," Working Paper Series 2440, European Central Bank.
    9. Abuka, Charles & Alinda, Ronnie & Minoiu, Camelia & Peydr�, Jos� Luis & Presbitero, Andrea, 2017. "Financial Development and Monetary Policy: Loan Applications, Rates, and Real Effects," CEPR Discussion Papers 12171, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. Galina Hale & Tümer Kapan & Camelia Minoiu & Philip Strahan, 2020. "Shock Transmission Through Cross-Border Bank Lending: Credit and Real Effects," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 33(10), pages 4839-4882.
    11. De Jonghe, Olivier & Dewachter, Hans & Ongena, Steven, 2020. "Bank capital (requirements) and credit supply: Evidence from pillar 2 decisions," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 60(C).
    12. Mircea Epure & Irina Mihai & Camelia Minoiu & José-Luis Peydró, 2017. "Household Credit, Global Financial Cycle, and Macroprudential Policies: Credit Register Evidence from an Emerging Country," Working Papers 1006, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    13. Van Bekkum, Sjoerd & Gabarró, Marc & Irani, Rustom & Peydró, José-Luis, 2019. "Take It to the Limit? The Effects of Household Leverage Caps," EconStor Preprints 216797, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.
    14. Ambrocio, Gene & Jokivuolle, Esa, 2017. "Should bank capital requirements be less risk-sensitive because of credit constraints?," Research Discussion Papers 10/2017, Bank of Finland.
    15. Paulo Roberto Scalco & Benjamin M. Tabak & Anderson Mutter Teixeira, 2019. "The Dark Side of Prudential Measures," Working papers - Textos para Discussao do Curso de Ciencias Economicas da UFG 078, Curso de Ciencias Economicas da Universidade Federal de Goias - FACE.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    macroprudential policy; spillovers; credit; bank capital; systemic risk;

    JEL classification:

    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • E60 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - General
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_7815. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Klaus Wohlrabe). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/cesifde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.