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The Role of Regulatory Arbitrage in U.S. Banks’ International Lending Flows: Bank-Level Evidence

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  • Judit Temesvary

Abstract

This paper examines how cross-border differences in the stringency of bank regulations affect U.S. banks’ international activities. The analysis relies on a unique bank-level dataset on the globally most active U.S. banks’ balance sheet as well as their cross-border, foreign affiliate lending and foreign market entry choices in 82 foreign countries in the 2003-2013 period. Results show that U.S. banks are significantly more likely to enter foreign markets with relatively laxer bank capital and disclosure requirements, and exit foreign markets with relatively stricter deposit insurance schemes and more restrictions on activities. Banks substitute away from foreign affiliate lending (via subsidiaries in the foreign country) towards cross-border lending (originating from the U.S.) in foreign countries with more powerful and independent bank regulators and limits on activities.

Suggested Citation

  • Judit Temesvary, 2015. "The Role of Regulatory Arbitrage in U.S. Banks’ International Lending Flows: Bank-Level Evidence," FIW Working Paper series 151, FIW.
  • Handle: RePEc:wsr:wpaper:y:2015:i:151
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Temesvary, Judit & Ongena, Steven & Owen, Ann L., 2018. "A global lending channel unplugged? Does U.S. monetary policy affect cross-border and affiliate lending by global U.S. banks?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 50-69.
    2. Vollmer Uwe, 2015. "‚Stairway to Heaven‘ oder ‚Highway to Hell‘? – Eine Einschätzung der Europäischen Bankenunion / ‚Stairway to Heaven‘ or ‚Highway to Hell‘? – An Evaluation of the European Banking Union," ORDO. Jahrbuch für die Ordnung von Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft, De Gruyter, vol. 66(1), pages 147-174, January.
    3. Előd Takáts & Judit Temesvary, 2017. "Can macroprudential measures make cross-border lending more resilient?," BIS Working Papers 683, Bank for International Settlements.
    4. W. Scott Frame & Atanas Mihov & Leandro Sanz, 2017. "Foreign Investment, Regulatory Arbitrage, and the Risk of U.S. Banking Organizations," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2017-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    5. Raphael Auer & Steven Ongena, 2016. "The countercyclical capital buffer and the composition of bank lending," BIS Working Papers 593, Bank for International Settlements.
    6. Elöd Takáts & Judit Temesvary, 2019. "Can Macroprudential Measures Make Cross-Border Lending More Resilient? Lessons from the Taper Tantrum," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 15(1), pages 61-105, March.
    7. Jose M Berrospide & Ricardo Correa & Linda S Goldberg & Friederike Niepmann, 2017. "International Banking and Cross-Border Effects of Regulation: Lessons from the United States," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 13(2), pages 435-476, March.
    8. Előd Takáts & Judit Temesvary, 2019. "How does the interaction of macroprudential and monetary policies affect cross-border bank lending?," BIS Working Papers 782, Bank for International Settlements.
    9. Vollmer Uwe, 2016. "The Asymmetric Implementation of the European Banking Union (EBU): Consequences for Financial Stability," International Journal of Management and Economics, Warsaw School of Economics, Collegium of World Economy, vol. 50(1), pages 7-26, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    International bank lending; Cross-border regulatory arbitrage; Foreign market entry and exit; Balance sheet effects;

    JEL classification:

    • F3 - International Economics - - International Finance
    • F4 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance
    • G2 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services

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