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Decennial Census Return Rates: The Role of Social Capital

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  • Julie L. Hotchkiss

Abstract

This paper explores how useful information about social and civic engagement (social capital) might be to the U.S. Census Bureau in their efforts to improve predictions of mail return rates for the Decennial Census (DC) at the census tract level. Through construction of Hard-to-count (HRC) scores and multivariate analysis, we find that if information about social capital were available, predictions of response rates would be marginally improved.

Suggested Citation

  • Julie L. Hotchkiss, 2017. "Decennial Census Return Rates: The Role of Social Capital," Working Papers 17-39, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  • Handle: RePEc:cen:wpaper:17-39
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    File URL: https://www2.census.gov/ces/wp/2017/CES-WP-17-39.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Hanming Fang & Michael P. Keane & Dan Silverman, 2008. "Sources of Advantageous Selection: Evidence from the Medigap Insurance Market," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 116(2), pages 303-350, April.
    7. DiPasquale, Denise & Glaeser, Edward L., 1999. "Incentives and Social Capital: Are Homeowners Better Citizens?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 354-384, March.
    8. Thomas S. Dee & William N. Evans, 2003. "Teen Drinking and Educational Attainment: Evidence from Two-Sample Instrumental Variables Estimates," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(1), pages 178-209, January.
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