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On the local labor market determinants of female university enrolment in European regions


  • Alessandra Casarico
  • Paola Profeta
  • Chiara Pronzato


We empirically investigate the local labor market determinants of female decisions of investing in post-secondary education, focusing on the role of career interruptions and barriers to job promotions. We use EU-Silc data on educational decisions of women who completed secondary schooling. We construct indicators of the regional labor market, and exploit regional and time variability to identify how female educational investments react to changes in local labor markets. We find that the share of working women with children below 5, of women with managerial positions and self-employed positively affect the probability to enrol. The same does not hold for men.

Suggested Citation

  • Alessandra Casarico & Paola Profeta & Chiara Pronzato, 2012. "On the local labor market determinants of female university enrolment in European regions," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 278, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
  • Handle: RePEc:cca:wpaper:278

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    More about this item


    post-secondary education; managerial positions; self-employment; EU-Silc data; repeated cross-section.;

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population


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