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Unemployment and Early School Leaving

Author

Listed:
  • Micklewright, John
  • Pearson, Mark
  • Smith, Stephen

Abstract

Economic theory suggests that unemployment could affect human capital investment decisions in either direction. The authors use microdata on sixteen year-olds from the U.K. Family Expenditure Survey to examine the effects of household circumstances and regional unemployment rates on early school leaving in the United Kingdom between 1978 and 1984. During this period, unemployment rose rapidly and the proportion of pupils choosing to stay on at school beyond the age at which education was compulsory also increased from its historically low level. However, no evidence was found supporting the theory that unemployment caused this rise. Copyright 1990 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Micklewright, John & Pearson, Mark & Smith, Stephen, 1990. "Unemployment and Early School Leaving," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 100(400), pages 163-169, Supplemen.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:100:y:1990:i:400:p:163-69
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    Cited by:

    1. Venke Furre Haaland, 2016. "The lost generation: Effects of youth labor market opportunities on long-term labor market outcomes," Discussion Papers 835, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    2. Hermann, Zoltán, 2005. "A helyi munkaerőpiac hatása a középfokú továbbtanulási döntésekre
      [The local labour markets effect on decisions to enter secondary-level education]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(1), pages 39-60.
    3. David Armstrong & Duncan McVicar, 2000. "Value added in further education and vocational training in Northern Ireland," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(13), pages 1727-1736.
    4. Alessandra Casarico & Paola Profeta & Chiara Daniela Pronzato, 2016. "On the Regional Labour Market Determinants of Female University Enrolment in Europe," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(6), pages 1036-1053, June.
    5. Nancy Vandycke, 2001. "Access to Education for the Poor in Europe and Central Asia : Preliminary Evidence and Policy Implications," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13974.
    6. Cecilia Albert Verdú & Carlos Giovanni González Espitia & Jhon James Mora Rodríguez, 2013. "Determinantes de la demanda de educación universitaria en Colombia, 1980-2010," Revista de Economía Institucional, Universidad Externado de Colombia - Facultad de Economía, vol. 15(29), pages 169-194, July-Dece.
    7. Öster, Anna, 2006. "Parental unemployment and children's school performance," Working Paper Series 2006:5, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    8. Kristine Simson, 2015. "Explaining upper secondary school dropout: new evidence on the role of local labor markets," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 48(4), pages 1419-1444, June.
    9. Alessandra Casarico & Paola Profeta & Chiara Pronzato, 2012. "On the local labor market determinants of female university enrolment in European regions," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 278, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
    10. Meschi, Elena & Swaffield, Joanna K. & Vignoles, Anna, 2011. "The Relative Importance of Local Labour Market Conditions and Pupil Attainment on Post-Compulsory Schooling Decisions," IZA Discussion Papers 6143, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Juan Guio & Álvaro Choi & Josep-Oriol Escardíbul, 2016. "Labor markets, academic performance and the risk of school dropout: evidence for Spain," Working Papers 2016/9, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    12. Pastore, Francesco, 2005. "To Study or to Work? Education and Labour Market Participation of Young People in Poland," IZA Discussion Papers 1793, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Tumino, Alberto & Taylor, Mark P., 2015. "The impact of local labour market conditions on school leaving decisions," ISER Working Paper Series 2015-14, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    14. Binder, Melissa, 1999. "Schooling indicators during Mexico's "Lost decade"," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 183-199, April.
    15. Taylor, Mark P., 2013. "The labour market impacts of leaving education when unemployment is high: evidence from Britain," ISER Working Paper Series 2013-12, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    16. Haaland, Venke Furre, 2013. "The Lost Generation: Effects of Youth Labor Market Opportunities on Long-Term Labor Market Outcomes," UiS Working Papers in Economics and Finance 2013/8, University of Stavanger.
    17. O'Higgins, Niall, 2001. "Youth unemployment and employment policy: a global perspective," MPRA Paper 23698, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. Aedin Doris;, 1999. "The Means Testing Of Benefits And The Labour Supply Of The Wives Of Unemployed Men: Results From A Mover-Stayer Model," Economics, Finance and Accounting Department Working Paper Series n940999, Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, National University of Ireland - Maynooth.
    19. Alberto Tumino, 2013. "The effect of local labour market conditions on educational choices: a cross country comparison," ImPRovE Working Papers 13/06, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    20. Alam, Khorshed & Mamun, Shamsul Arifeen Khan, 2016. "The relationship between labour force status and educational attainment: Evidence from a system of simultaneous equations model," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 55-65.
    21. Rice, P., 2002. "The great divide: regional differences in education and training," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 0201, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
    22. Fernando Coloma & Bernardita Vial, 2003. "Desempleo e Inactividad Juvenil en Chile," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 40(119), pages 149-171.
    23. Biewen, Martin & Tapalaga, Madalina, 2017. "Early Tracking, Academic vs. Vocational Training and the Value of 'Second Chance' Options," IZA Discussion Papers 11080, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    24. San Segundo, María Jesús & Petrongolo, Barbara, 1998. "Staying-on at school at sixteen: the impact of labor market conditions in Spain," UC3M Working papers. Economics 6076, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    25. Simon Burgess & Carol Propper & Hedley Rees & Arran Shearer, 1999. "The Class of '81: The effects of early-career unemployment on subsequent unemployment experiences," CASE Papers 032, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.

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